Deconstructivist architecture

Deconstructivist architecture

Architecture that seeks to arrive at new forms of expression by turning away from structural restraints and functional and thematic hierarchies, and toward often nonrectangular, fantastic, and seemingly disjointed designs. Such work often represents an application of the philosophical theories of Jacques Derrida in France, who sought to arrive at new insights in literature by breaking apart literary texts into their contradictory and hidden components of meaning; this philosophy has been applied in the late 20th century to architectural structures usually called deconstructivist architecture.
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A flagship example of deconstructivist architecture, the imposing building was designed by architect Daniel Libeskind and officially opened in July 2002.
Members of the second group, which drew inspiration from the early-twentieth-century avant-garde and contemporary philosophy, were presented in the "Deconstructivist Architecture" exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 1988, leading to the first group's demise.
al respecto, por ejemplo, JOHNSON, Ph., y WIGLEY, M., Deconstructivist Architecture, MoMA Press, New York, Little, Brown/New York Graphic Society Books, 1988.
Early in his career, he was co-curator (with Philip Johnson) of the 1988 exhibition "Deconstructivist Architecture" at the Museum of Modern Art, which featured work from an emerging vanguard of architects and firms.
Like so much second-rate deconstructivist architecture, the new academic building at Cooper Union resembles a peacock in the sense that, under all the fuss and feathers -- structurally speaking -- stands a fairly ordinary building that squats in its cubic box without too much incident.
Although she had been lauded for at least the previous decade as the wonder woman of deconstructivist architecture, no one had taken Hadid on; her designs were considered theoretical and unbuildable.
Before that, Libeskind had become known as one of the subjects of the Museum of Modern Art's 1988 "Deconstructivist Architecture" exhibition, which put an end to the 1980s vogue for classicized "postmodernism." Libeskind won the competition, in part, by his verbal rather than his architectural skills.
Nevertheless, Gehry's virtuosity and experimentation allowed for his inclusion, alongside a younger generation, in the New York Deconstructivist Architecture exhibition (also 1988), with its ambitions to forge a hyper-Modernist avant-garde.
Caputo, and Jean-Luc Marion (I refer the reader to his insightful and provocative essay "In the name: how to avoid speaking of "negative theology.") "Architecture," the last Part of Volume III, begins with "Deconstructivist Architecture" by Mark Wigley and also comprehends pieces by Derrida, Andrew Benjamin, Peter Eisenman, Mark C.
In 1988, Philip Johnson put together an exhibition of "deconstructivist architecture" at MoMA that was meant to suggest that a new movement was afoot.
"Deconstructivist Architecture," the long-awaited display of the movement's deliberately chaotic, fractured forms, appeared at the Museum of Modern Art this summer.
Herman Deconstructivist." The cause for both: the exhibition "Deconstructivist Architecture," which had run from June 23 to August 30 that summer at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.