deductible


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Related to deductible: Tax deductible

deductible

On a building project, a type of insurance policy stipulating that in the event of loss, the insured is liable for a specified initial amount and the insurance company is liable for the amount above that figure, up to the insured amount.
References in periodicals archive ?
67(a) in Scott, 328 F3d 132 (2003).The court noted, however, that "[o]ther costs ordinarily incurred by masts, such as fees paid to trustees, expenses associated with judicial accountings, and the costs of preparing and filing fiduciary income tax returns, are not ordinarily incurred by individual taxpayers, and they would be fully deductible under the exception created by [section] 67(e)" Id.
While separate limits may apply, the theft and the property damage constitute one occurrence, so only one deductible should be subtracted.
In general, for clients who expect their marginal tax rate in retirement to remain the same as it is currently, a 401(k) or a deductible IRA is equivalent to a Roth IRA.
Consumers can only have an HSA with an accompanying high deductible plan.
This holds true both in the case without a voluntary deductible and in the case with a voluntary deductible.
Answer: The deductibles section of the policy refers to the monetary deductible amount that the insured agrees to pay in the event of a covered loss.
The ACA bears much responsibility for the high deductibles. The law's multiple mandates on insurers have driven the cost of coverage up.
The plan has a $2,500 deductible. The SBC states "$25 copay/visit" for "Primary care visit to treat an injury or illness" under the heading "Your Cost If You Use a Network Provider." But the SBC does not say whether the patient has to satisfy the deductible before being able to get in-network sick care, or if the patient has to pay the $2,500 deductible first, and then can get sick care visits for a $25 co-payment.
For example, just a third of lower-income families have sufficient liquid financial assets to cover a $1,200 deductible for an individual or a $2,400 deductible for a family, and 20 percent have enough to cover an annual deductible of $2,500 for an individual or $5,000 for a family.
MEI has a commercial property policy providing $1,000,000 business personal property coverage with a $10,000 deductible. The policy applies on a replacement cost basis with agreed value (suspension of coinsurance).
That would eliminate the payment of any deductible at the time of filing a claim if the loss reaches a level where primary insurance kicks in.