Deed restriction


Also found in: Financial.

Deed restriction

A statement included in the deed to a piece of land, placing limitations upon the use of the property.

deed restriction

A limitation on the use of land, which is set forth in a deed conveying the restriction.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Energy Act provides that no deed restriction, covenant or similar binding agreement can prohibit, or have the effect of prohibiting, a solar energy system from being installed on a building covered by the deed restriction, covenant or binding agreement.
The court also cited a 2008 case involving Rackham Golf Course in Huntington Woods as an example of a deed restriction that wasn't ambiguous.
In the suit, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer and the City Council claim a deed restriction prohibits luxury apartments on the site.
"Donlin hasn't actually purchased the whole deed restriction yet," said Wyn Menefee, director of the trust's land office.
Contributors including architects, urban planners, geographers, historians, and journalists shed light on debates related to beach tags, gated communities, farmerAEs markets, racial deed restriction, rent control, public bathrooms, urban renewal, and youth curfew.
Actually, there's a much worse scenario: Eugene and Lane County, frustrated in their attempts to get a court ruling on the land exchange and assured by their attorneys that they're in the clear, go ahead with their respective construction plans - only to find out later, after millions of dollars have been spent, that they're in violation of a deed restriction.
To aid preservation efforts, the college Board of Trustees approved a permanent deed restriction that includes development buffers to help maintain the ecological integrity of the area.
(9) restrictive covenants, including the deed restriction regarding the
The next survey question specifically asked if the owner would purchase property with a deed restriction that was copied directly from the NFR letter, the actual language of record.
Remaining possible users, therefore, are non-profit entities, for example, houses of worship (assuming such a use does not violate the 1973 deed restriction), universities, schools, etc.
"If you put in a deed restriction eliminating residential use, and the small residual will dissipate, there is really no problem.
It's recorded as a form of deed restriction and is usually enforced in perpetuity (though a time limit can be specified).