necessity

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necessity

1. Philosophy
a. a condition, principle, or conclusion that cannot be otherwise
b. the constraining force of physical determinants on all aspects of life
2. Logic
a. the property of being necessary
b. a statement asserting that some property is essential or statement is necessarily true
c. the operator that indicates that the expression it modifies is true in all possible worlds.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
were to invoke the defense of necessity in such a case, such a claim
("Given the Supreme Court's conclusion that the common law defense of necessity remains controversial and cannot override a value judgment already determined by the legislature, the common law doctrine of necessity provides little support to the Alliance's proposed right.").
In this case, Germany's interest in maintaining its security and integrity was seen as essential enough to merit a defense of necessity. (37) Indeed, until the late twentieth century, national security was seen as the only state interest essential enough to merit a valid necessity defense.
547, 551-57 (2007) (providing examples of various international disputes in which the defense of necessity has been invoked in military and environmental situations, in addition to economic situations).
(14) The claimant relied on the defense of necessity, arguing that based on unexpected inclement weather, he was forced to port in the West Indies to protect the cargo and the lives of the crew.
He said that people should pursue popular action against Israel, and that if they find themselves in court after entering offices or wherever, then they could utilize the defense of necessity and argue that they were doing it for the greater good.
(21) However, the Supreme Court recently affirmed that where a statute expressly provides for exceptions to the law, unless the necessity defense is included in those express exceptions the defense of necessity fails, (22) suggesting a shift in federal jurisprudence.

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