deindustrialization

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deindustrialization

the process in which a previously industrialized or industrializing economy, or society, or region, reverts partly or wholly to a preindustrialized form. This process may occur as the outcome of international economic competition (see DEPENDENCY THEORY, also IMPERIALISM).

To some degree, the process may also occur within developed societies (e.g. the recent regional decline of manufacturing industries such as textiles or shipbuilding in parts of Western Europe). Nor is it simply a recent phenomenon. Rather, it can be seen as a ‘normal’ aspect of the workings of capitalism on an international stage at all phases of its development. According to WALLERSTEIN (1974), societies as different as Poland and India are examples of economies which underwent periods of deindustrialization in the course of the development of the world economy.

Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
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This also led to deindustrialisation and promoting consumerism.
Over a number of decades, it has experienced a gradual but steady process of deindustrialisation, largely due to global economic restructuring processes.
In particular, deindustrialisation and the decline of deference are shifts that the left must take into account when developing policy.
Speaking after the launch of her party's Action Plan for Wales, Ms Wood said a cash injection was "urgently needed" to kick-start a "genuine" economic recovery, generating jobs in all parts of the country and revitalising areas decimated by deindustrialisation.
Rather it is Coventry who had to combat Tory deindustrialisation policies in the 1980s and 1990s and has been the victim of austerity extra during the last sevent years with more to come in the areas of health and school funding.
The organisation's former chair Manda Scott condemned her for "neo-liberalism, deindustrialisation, free market ideology, Scottish poll tax, selling council houses and failing to act on early stages of global warming".
India's employment problems could be intensified because of "premature deindustrialisation," a phenomenon, defined by a UN report as one in which opportunities in industry shrink sooner and at much lower levels of income than for early industrialisers.
A TEESSIDE University PhD student is researching the impact of deindustrialisation on the lives of the region's women.
The loss of even more jobs, this time at Redcar, and the further deindustrialisation of this country, contrasts with Europe, where they still mine coal, smelt steel and manufacture ships and planes.
"I have brought the screening to the University of Hudderseld because I come from mining heritage and, a generation on, the legacy of the strike and its subsequent deindustrialisation in other industries is still rife within every former coaleld community in the country."
[48.] Singh, A., 'UK Industry and the World Economy: A Case of Deindustrialisation?', 1977, Cambridge Journal of Economics, vol.