Demetrius I


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Related to Demetrius I: Demetrius I of Macedon

Demetrius I

, king of Macedon
Demetrius I (Demetrius Poliorcetes) (dĭmēˈtrēəs pŏlˌēôrsēˈtēz), c.337–283 B.C., king of Macedon. The son of Antigonus I, he proved himself a very able commander in his father's wars, particularly against Ptolemy I. Though Ptolemy defeated him at Gaza in 312 B.C., Demetrius was able to expel Cassander from Athens; he then defeated Ptolemy off Salamis and took Cyprus. Although he had huge armaments, including new weapons of assault, he failed (305 B.C.) to take Rhodes by sea. When Cassander, Seleucus I, and Lysimachus, fearing the power of Antigonus, allied themselves against him, Antigonus and Demetrius were badly defeated in the battle of Ipsus in 301 B.C., and Antigonus was killed. Demetrius later became reconciled with Seleucus I and regained Athens for himself in 295 B.C. In order to obtain the throne of Macedon he murdered his competitors, including the sons of Cassander, and succeeded (294 B.C.) to the throne. He had his father's ambition to conquer all Asia, but his enemies united against him, and when Lysimachus and Pyrrhus invaded Macedon he was forced (285 B.C.) to take refuge with Seleucus, who held him until he died. His son, Antigonus II, made good his claim to the throne of Macedon.

Demetrius I

, king of ancient Syria
Demetrius I (Demetrius Soter) (dĭmēˈtrēəs) (sōˈtər), c.187–150 B.C., king of ancient Syria (162–150 B.C.), son of Seleucus IV. He was sent as a hostage to Rome, where he remained during the reigns of his father and his uncle Antiochus IV. After Antiochus died, he was succeeded by his son Antiochus V, but Demetrius escaped (162 B.C.), killed his cousin, and took the throne. He put down the revolt of the general Timarchus in Babylon and set out to crush the Maccabees. The usurper Alexander Balas rose against Demetrius and was supported by the Maccabean party as well as by Egypt and Pergamum. Demetrius was defeated in battle.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Demetrius I

 

King from about 189 to about 167 B.C. of the Greco-Bactrian kingdom, which under his rule reached the highest point of its power.

Demetrius conquered a number of regions in what is now Afghanistan and northwest India. He built a capital in north-west India, and on his coins he gave himself the title of King of the Indians. Around 175 B.C., Eucratides, the king of Bactria, revolted against Demetrius. In the battle against him Demetrius perished and his kingdom disintegrated. Menander, Demetrius’s general, became king of the Indian part of the kingdom.

REFERENCES

Tolstov, S. P. Drevnii Khorezm. Moscow, 1948.
Trever, K. Pamiatniki greko-baktriiskogo iskusstva. Moscow-Leningrad, 1940.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
For these reasons, the solution proposed by Demetrius is unpersuasive.
"Whereas Lysander (Demetrius's rival in love) is a lot more poetic and flamboyant about his love, Demetrius is very blunt and prosaic, using lots of legal terminology.
After the correctly matched couples "calmly consulted together," Demetrius is made to atone for his misconduct: "It was soon agreed that, as Demetrius had given up his pretensions to Hermia, he should endeavour to prevail upon her father to revoke the cruel sentence of death which had been passed against her" (21).