Demetrius Phalereus


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Demetrius Phalereus

Demetrius Phalereus (dĭmēˈtrēəs) (fəlērˈo͞os, fəlērˈēəs) [Lat.,=of Phalerum], d. c.280 B.C., Athenian orator. One of the first Peripatetics, he wrote extensively in history, rhetoric, and literary criticism. He was governor of Athens (317–307 B.C.) under Cassander. In 307 B.C., when Demetrius I took Athens, Demetrius Phalereus was overthrown. Escaping to Egypt, he rose in the favor of Ptolemy I, to whom he is said to have suggested a library. On the accession of Ptolemy Philadelphus, Demetrius again went into exile, dying soon afterward.
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References in classic literature ?
Demetrius Phalereus, a philosopher at Athens about 300 B.C., is said to have made the first collection of these fables.
At all events, he accepted philosophically the punishments imposed on him of a reprimand, a month's gating, and an order to translate ninety pages from the works of Demetrius Phalereus.