Demoiselle Crane


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Demoiselle Crane

 

(Anthropoides virgo), or demoiselle, a bird of the family Gruidae. It measures about 90 cm long and weighs 2-2.7 kg. The plumage is bluish gray; the head and neck are black. The crop has long black feathers, and there are tufts of white feathers along the sides of the head.

The demoiselle crane is distributed in the dry steppes and semideserts of Europe, Asia, and northwestern Africa. In the USSR it is found from the southwestern borders to Tuva and Transbaikalia. It winters in Africa and southern Asia. The number of demoiselle cranes and their area of distribution have diminished sharply as a result of the plowing of virgin lands and the use of chemical fertilizers. The bird lays one to three eggs on the ground, often without any nesting material. The eggs are primarily incubated by the female for about one month. The demoiselle crane feeds on plant shoots, on seeds, and, less frequently, on insects.

References in periodicals archive ?
Covering a distance of over 5,000 kilometres, demoiselle cranes migrate from Russia every year to spend winter in Gujarat and Rajasthan.
Good to know Trivia: The demoiselle cranes fly over 5,000 km in over two weeks to reach Khichan from Mongolia.
HI THERE: These Demoiselle Crane chicks are a cause for delight at Martin Mere wildfowl centre
And due to its strategic location on bird migration routes, it also hosts visitors including vultures from Egypt, the common and demoiselle cranes from Siberia, the blue-tailed bee-eater from Europe, and the houbara bustard from Iran and Iraq.
Twice a day in winter, around 7,000 demoiselle cranes descend on a small gravel square in central Khichan to gorge on grain left out for them.
Aerial shots of the immense taiga forest take one's breath away, as does the camera's accompaniment of Demoiselle cranes in their migration across the Himalayas.
In Saudi Arabia, 11-year-old Aishah Ali Abakar Barnawi spends her days camping with scientists in the Aja Mountains, helping to count migrating demoiselle cranes. Back in the city, she carries snakes and reptiles on her shoulders and gives sidewalk lectures about the creatures of the Arabian Desert.
These were the demoiselle cranes that I first saw many years ago on winter range in the Sudan.
Other firsts to be captured on film include the mating rituals of the blue bird of paradise and golden eagles taking demoiselle cranes on the wing as they migrate over Mount Everest.