denarius

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denarius

1. a silver coin of ancient Rome, often called a penny in translation
2. a gold coin worth 25 silver denarii
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Denarius

 

an ancient Roman silver coin consisting of ten asses. It was first minted in 269 B.C. and contained 4.55 g of pure silver. A number of countries that had close trade ties with ancient Rome, such as the lands occupied by presentday Iraq and Yugoslavia, still retain monetary units derived from the Roman denarius.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Denarii.Cash is in the process of activating more coins and they look forward to add binance, bitcoin cash as well as litecoin, ripple and stellar to their wallet.
The denarii, known as the South Warwickshire Roman Hoard, will go on display in the museum in Market Square, Warwick, from July 9 for the venue's 60th anniversary.
PhX Media Group, a digital marketing and electronic commerce agency, announced yesterday that it has signed an agency agreement with payment and information services provider Denarii Systems.
THE AA has predicted that by Easter, the Christian festival of Egg, we will be paying pounds 1.20 a gallon for petrol and by default one or two denarii more for diesel.
He recently commented: 'I am not antiantoniniani, but my interests lie primarily with denarii, sestertii, and the gold aurei and solidi.' My ears pricked up when I heard the coined (if you'll pardon the pun) term ANTIANTONINIANI, a rare 15-letter pyramid word, containing one O, two T's, three A's, four I's and five N's.
The 1,141 silver Denarii coins, the earliest dating from 206-195BC, were discovered in Stratford, Warwickshire, in July last year.
In Roman times, a pound of lavender flowers would cost about 100 denarii, which was about a month's wages for a farm laborer.
"I have written to you several times that I have bought ears of grain, about 5000 modii, on account of which I need denarii. Unless you send me something, I will lose what I have given as a down payment, and will be embarrassed, so I ask you: send me some denarii as soon as possible," it says.
The author has published a similar book for ancient Rome entitled Ancient Rome on 5 Denarii a Day (reviewed below).
Too bad/about your wife, though, washing her hands/a hundred times a day./No doubt in time/to come someone will make a play of it./Tell her what's done is done--/what's one life less as long as it's not hers./Perhaps you'd like to bring her too next time.//That's fifty denarii, please.
If we could take a time machine to 300 A.D., we could visit hundreds of mints located throughout the Roman Empire all hard at work minting denarii for Emperor Diocletian.