wavelength-division multiplexing

(redirected from Dense WDM)

wavelength-division multiplexing

[¦wāv‚leŋth də¦vizh·ən ′məl·tə‚pleks·iŋ]
(communications)
The sharing of the total available pass-band of a transmission medium in the optical portion of the electromagnetic spectrum by assigning individual information streams to signals of different wavelengths. Abbreviated WDM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rouvillain et al., "Dense WDM (0.27/bit/s/Hz) 4x40 Gbit/s dispersion-managed transmission over 10 000 km with in-line optical regeneration by channel pairs," Electronics Letters, vol.
3 is a 9.953 Gbps 8 channel dense WDM (DWDM) transmission system with non-return-to-zero (NRZ) encoding technique, intensity onoff keying modulation format, and an in-line FOPA.
Lunardi, "Monolithic eight-wavelength demultiplexed receiver for dense WDM applications," IEEE Photon.
Increased channel separation would prevent the implementation of a dense WDM. Similarly, reducing the levels of FWM crosstalk by choosing unequal channel frequency spacing may not be a practical option because this technique also needs additional optical bandwidth.
Coarse WDM (CWDM) in PON is more likely implemented in near term than Dense WDM (DWDM).
Ltd., Shenzhen, China, and approved by IBM for network applications, provides dense WDM for independent data channels using any protocol.
This cable will utilize the most advanced state-of-the-art Dense WDM systems, with an initial capacity of 40Gbit/s transmission speed, upgradable to 1.92Tbit/s.
Almost before these issues were dealt with, dense WDM (DWDM) arrived on the scene, presenting network architects with further problems.
These are commonly referred to as dense WDM for systems in which the wavelength is on the order of 1 nanometer [1].
While dense WDM (DWDM) is adopted for the WAN and MAN networks, access networks are more sensitive to cost and thus the use of the coarse WDM (CWDM) technique could be more suitable for such applications due to the large channel separations which eliminates the need for high cost, well-stabilized laser sources required in DWDM systems.
These technologies make it possible to generate dense WDM signals with bit rates of 100 Gbps and beyond per channel and transmit them over long distances.
Dense WDM developers have yet to look at the challenges of what I call synchronization.