dental

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dental

[′dent·əl]
(anatomy)
Pertaining to the teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The perception of Forensic Odontology among dentists was checked by enquiring about the significance of dental record keeping, gender and race identification, significance of Rugae pattern and tooth as a source of DNA.
The accuracy of AM dental records is a legal responsibility of the dental team, but records are known to occasionally contain errors.
The measure requires each certificate of medical or dental record be signed by a duly licensed physician, physical assistant, or nurse practitioner, and an authorized to practice in the jurisdiction in which the examination was given.
In the case of the two nurses, their dental records would be enough to determine their identities, he said.
Forensic dental identification is based on the morphological comparison and matching of dental records, mainly available as radiographic images.
DURHAM oil executive Carole Waugh's body had to be identified by her dental records, an inquest heard.
Speaking of education, be sure to check out this issue's free CE Course, "Electronic Dental Records: Start Taking the Steps" (pg.
Dental providers entered treatment workload into the CDA and recorded treatment notes, treatment plans, and other information on paper dental records. In subsequent years, the CDA was enhanced to captured data on patient treatment needs, caries risk, and tobacco use.
Dr Robin Whyman and two other dental experts from Hutt Valley District Health Board and Capital and Coast District Health Board analysed dental records of about 3000 children aged 2-12 on the Kapiti Coast.
The office of the chief medical examiner made the identification based on medical and dental records. Ms.
His body was discovered late on Tuesday afternoon by a diving team and he had to be formally identified from his dental records.
These included the increase in fertility that accompanied the rise of agriculture, with these factors thereby contributing to the differences in the prevalence of dental caries (cavities), A comprehensive review of dental records in prehistoric and current human populations reveals that women have more dental problems than men because of reproductive and fertility factors that seem to be linked to female hormones.