dental arch

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dental arch

[¦dent·əl ′ärch]
(anatomy)
The parabolic curve formed by the cutting edges and masticating surfaces of the teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
He did, however, come upon groups that advocated vegetarian diets for ethical reasons: "In every instance where the groups involved had been long under this teaching, I found evidence of degeneration in the form of dental caries, and in the new generation in the form of abnormal dental arches to an extent very much higher than in the primitive groups who were not under this influence.
The eAppliance holds both dental arches in stability preventing tooth movement, great for Orthodontic patients.
Hence, due to the clinical significance of hypomineralised second primary molars and for the scarcity of information available regarding its aetiological factors, the aims of the present study were to identify the risk factor/s associated with hypomineralised second primary molars in a group of school-aged children in Mosul city, Iraq; and to relate the location of the affected tooth in the dental arches with the timing of an earlier illness/condition occurrence.
When the dental arches don't reach adult width, the result is a narrower palate that can't fully accommodate an adult tongue, as well as a poorly positioned lower jaw.
As the dentist's confidence increases, the treatment of quadrants and complete dental arches can be completed either at the dental chair or in the dental laboratory on traditional casts.
Nightguards are intra-oral dental appliances, interposed between the teeth of dental arches.
Geometrical form of occlusal surfaces, spatial arrangement of teeth in dental arches and condition of supporting structures has crucial influence on masticatory function efficiency.
Tongue retainers are usually constructed from flexible polyvinyl materials that are adapted to the contours of a patient's teeth and dental arches.
Correction of the Dental Arches and Malocclusion Terry E.
The terms used to describe tooth surfaces in the dental arches differ from the more familiar anatomic descriptors.
Common radiographs include periapical views to identify the crown and root, bite-wing radiographs to examine the interproximal spaces, occlusal views to image large segments of the dental arch, and panoramic views to identify both dental arches and their supporting structures.
Once warmed up under a hot faucet and inserted, the acrylic elastic resin contracts as it cools to affix itself firmly to both dental arches.