deportation

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deportation,

expulsion of an alienalien,
in law, any person residing in one political community while owing allegiance to another. A procedure known as naturalization permits aliens to become citizens.

Each nation establishes conditions upon which aliens will be admitted, and makes laws concerning them.
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 from a country by an act of its government. The term is not applied ordinarily to sending a national into exileexile,
removal of a national from his or her country, or the civilized parts of it, for a long period of time or for life. Exile may be a forceful expulsion by the government or a voluntary removal by the citizen, sometimes in order to escape punishment.
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 or to committing one convicted of crime to an overseas penal colony (historically called transportation). In international law the right to send an alien to the country to which he or she owes allegiance (or to any country that will accept him or her) derives from a government's sovereigntysovereignty,
supreme authority in a political community. The concept of sovereignty has had a long history of development, and it may be said that every political theorist since Plato has dealt with the notion in some manner, although not always explicitly.
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. In the United States, deportation is the responsibility of the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement of the Dept. of Homeland Security.

Except under the Alien and Sedition ActsAlien and Sedition Acts,
1798, four laws enacted by the Federalist-controlled U.S. Congress, allegedly in response to the hostile actions of the French Revolutionary government on the seas and in the councils of diplomacy (see XYZ Affair), but actually designed to destroy Thomas
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 of 1798 there was no American deportation law until the enactment in 1882 of a statute aimed at certain Chinese immigrants. The class of deportable aliens was subsequently enlarged several times, coming to include persons who before their entry into the United States were insane, feeble-minded, illiterate, or diseased in various ways. Many foreigners suspected of involvement in radical political activity were deported during the "Red Scare" of 1919. The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 removed the statute of limitations on any kind of deportation.

The largest group of deported persons are those who have entered the country illegally. In the 1980s and 1990s expulsion of some of the numerous refugees from such Caribbean countries as Cuba and Haiti raised controversy. A deported alien cannot reenter the United States without special permission from the attorney general.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Deportation

 

(also banishment, exile), in law, specific kinds of exile employed in the 18th and 19th centuries in accordance with French criminal laws.

The first deportation of politically unreliable people to Guiana was established by the 1791 law on suspicious people. Deportation for terms up to life was included in the French Criminal Code of 1810. A law of Mar. 23, 1872, defined exile as spending one’s life outside the boundaries of a continent in designated deportation areas. It provided for the establishment of a central deportation camp on the island of Nou and a fortified area (a fortress) on the Ducos Peninsula (New Caledonia). Deportation was used not only against recidivistic criminals but also as a reprisal against revolutionaries (in 1872 captured Communards were sent to islands in New Caledonia).

Deportation should be distinguished from other forms of exile used in France—transportation (forced labor with exile to Guiana or another French territory abroad) and relegation (a supplementary punishment in the form of exile, used for dangerous recidivists after they had served their terms in prisons of metropolitan France). Deportation has not been used since 1880.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

deportation

Law
1. the act of expelling an alien from a country; expulsion
2. the act of transporting someone from his country; banishment
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Coalition Against the Deportation of Irish Children (CADIC) spokeswoman Eleanor Edmund said: "There is a substantial increase in the number of these orders."
Indeed, consider these headlines and articles: "Vatican Radio Denounces Nazi Acts in Poland"-Jewish Advocate (Boston), January 26, 1940; "Laval Spurns Pope--25,000 Jews in France Arrested for Deportation"--Canadian Jewish Chronicle, September 4, 1942; "Jewish Hostages in Rome: Vatican Protests"--Jewish Chronicle (London), October 29, 1943.
(121) The court found that unless an alien's speech is "directed to inciting or producing imminent lawless action and likely to incite or produce such action," such speech may not be curtailed by the chill of deportation or otherwise.
Gardai will also have the power to detain a person at the same time that a deportation order is being served on them if they suspect they will abscond.
Still, the threat of eventual deportation hangs in the air.
I can't really confirm or comment on that because police have not made us aware of the reasons surrounding the deportation of the CEO.
Thousands of illegal Ghanaian immigrants are reportedly in the grips of the US authorities and are due for deportation.
The deportations have been criticised for tearing apart families and for repenalising offenders who have already paid their debt to society.
Activists and nonpartisan civil rights organizations have (http://www.ibtimes.com/immigration-reform-2017-deportations-detention-increase-human-rights-crisis-waiting-2469779) condemned the president's plans to dramatically increase detention and deportations, saying the expansion could become a human rights crisis under Trump.
Taiwan had recalled Donald Dee, its de facto envoy in Manila, after raging over the deportations.
THE government has been "slightly lax" in enforcing deportation orders against failed asylum seekers, the Justice Minister admitted yesterday.