deposit feeder


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deposit feeder

[də′päz·ət ‚fēd·ər]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any animal that feeds on the detritus that collects on the substratum at the bottom of water. Also known as detritus feeder.
References in periodicals archive ?
volutator essentially seems to be a deposit feeder that rakes surface material into the burrow with its long second antennae, and there sifts it and rejects inedible matter.
The scheme allows savers to invest a lump sum of between pounds 2,700 and pounds 4,320 into a Liverpool Victoria deposit feeder account, which drip feeds the maximum annual premium into the friendly society's tax exempt savings plan.
Of course, if heterotrophic bacteria are a major food resource for deposit feeders, a deposit feeder's [[Delta].
Changes in a benthic community associated with dense beds of a burrowing deposit feeder, Callianassa californiensis.
Increasing nutrient loads enhance the production of benthic and/or pelagic microalgae (Graneli and Sundback 1985; Howarth, 1988) and, hence, increase the amount of available food for benthic grazers, suspension feeders, and deposit feeders and ultimately for carnivores.
Benthic invertebrates were designated as carnivores, scavengers, suspension feeders, or deposit feeders using the classification scheme developed by Walker and Bambach (1974).
Also, paired t-tests were used to compar e coefficients of variation of densities of suspension and deposit feeders.
Increased densities of benthic macroinvertebrates, especially deposit feeders, have been found in dense zebra mussel colonies in lakes (Dermott et al.
As well as `irrigating' the sediments with oxygen, the deposit feeders help to mix ammonia and nitrate into usually anaerobic sediments, and their faecal pellets encourage the presence of bacteria.
Moreover, the feeding activities of macrobenthic deposit feeders (animals that feed by ingesting sediment) can alter the abundance, metabolic activity and composition of the microbial community (Hargrave, 1970; Morrison and White, 1980; Bianchi and Levinton, 1981), which in turn can be linked (through nutrient cycling, for example) with density-dependent consumer effects on resource quality and supply.