deposit feeder


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deposit feeder

[də′päz·ət ‚fēd·ər]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any animal that feeds on the detritus that collects on the substratum at the bottom of water. Also known as detritus feeder.
References in periodicals archive ?
The deposit feeder D3, distributed from the Gulf of Alaska to southern California, is considered on the east coast of Canada.
Persson and Rosenberg (2003) showed that the common deposit feeder Amphiura filiformis significantly reduced the proportion of S.
The feeding of Corophium volutator was first studied by Hart (1930), who stated that the species is primarily a surface deposit feeder. But Hart also noticed that, by the beating activity of the pleopods, C.
The scheme allows savers to invest a lump sum of between pounds 2,700 and pounds 4,320 into a Liverpool Victoria deposit feeder account, which drip feeds the maximum annual premium into the friendly society's tax exempt savings plan.
Of course, if heterotrophic bacteria are a major food resource for deposit feeders, a deposit feeder's [[Delta].sup.13]C will be difficult to distinguish from that of the bacteria's food.
Changes in a benthic community associated with dense beds of a burrowing deposit feeder, Callianassa californiensis.
planktophilus is a deposit feeder. Food in the form of sediment, detritus, and interstitial plankton is trapped in mucus on the proboscis and transported posteriorly over its surface toward the mouth.
Increasing nutrient loads enhance the production of benthic and/or pelagic microalgae (Graneli and Sundback 1985; Howarth, 1988) and, hence, increase the amount of available food for benthic grazers, suspension feeders, and deposit feeders and ultimately for carnivores.
The macrobenthic community was dominated by subsurface and surface deposit feeders (36% and 30% Figure 4(a)).
Benthic invertebrates were designated as carnivores, scavengers, suspension feeders, or deposit feeders using the classification scheme developed by Walker and Bambach (1974).