Panic of 1873

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Panic of 1873

bank failures led to extended depression. [Am. Hist.: Van Doren, 267–268]
References in periodicals archive ?
The threat of radicalized workers following the 1871 Paris Commune and labor activism during the Depression of 1873 cemented the party's leadership behind the forces of capital.
The depression of 1873 did not last six years but at most 27 months, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research.
But a series of events beginning with the depression of 1873 and followed by a Democratic sweep of the House in 1874 would harshly rearrange the nation's politics.
A working-class appeal for governmental relief from the effects of the Depression of 1873 led to New York City's Tompkins Square police riot of 13 January 1874, revealing basic disagreements over what constituted "liberty.
Immigration in the 1850s and 1860s had already strained New York's relief rolls, and the depression of 1873 sounded the death-knell of the outdoor relief system.
Some were brought down by inadequate financing, which made them fail during the Depression of 1873.
The book looks first at the activities of Albany's early organized printers and iron molders, the more militant labor reform working class movements of the postbellum era, and the defensive strikes and actions of organized workers following the depression of 1873.

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