Death in Venice

(redirected from Der Tod in Venedig)

Death in Venice

aging successful author loses his lifelong self-discipline in his love for a beautiful Polish boy. [Ger. Lit: Death in Venice]
References in periodicals archive ?
But Mann's allusions to the dangers of intoxication are not limited--in time or subject matter--to his engagement with fascism: predating "Mario und der Zauberer" by more than fifteen years, Der Tod in Venedig, in which Aschenbach's desire for young Tadzio plunges him into a delirious haze, anticipates an ethically inflected treatment of intoxication that becomes much more pronounced in his later works.
Ritchie Robertson writes that in Der Tod in Venedig Mann comments on the unstable relation between art and desire through the protagonist.
Thomas Mann (1875-1955), escritor aleman nacionalizado esta-dunidense, escribio en 1912 la novela corta Der Tod in Venedig (Muerte en Venecia), una de sus mejores obras, llevada a la pantalla en 1971 por el cineasta italiano Luchino Visconti conde de Lonate Pozzolo (1906-1976) como Morte a Venizia, resulto mucho mas melodramatica que la novela, en virtud de algunos cambios introducidos por Visconti: el protagonista Gustav von Aschenbach interpretado por Dirk Bogarde no es escritor sino un compositor, inspirado en Gustav Mahler, cuya musica se escucha a lo largo del filme, en especial el hermoso Adagietto de la Quinta Sinfonia.
But he is also acutely aware that the theme of lateness saturates all of Mann's writing and so he frequently refers back to earlier works, especially Der Tod in Venedig.
After publication of the novellas Kroger, Tonio and Tristan (both 1903), he took up the tragic dilemma of the artist with Der Tod in Venedig (1912; Death in Venice), a somber masterpiece.
Dierks, as often before, asserts as a fact that when writing Der Tod in Venedig Mann not only read but studied Freud's essay Der Wahn unddie Traume in W.
Contributions which are likely to be of greater interest to the specialist include Hans Rudolf Vaget's rereading of Doktor Faustus, Eva Wessell's discussion of Der Zauberberg's affinities with Mann's essayistic reflections on the First World War, and Hans-Joachim Sandberg's stimulating consideration of Mann's abandoned novel on Frederick the Great and its place in the genesis and architecture of Der Tod in Venedig.
Aschenbach's Homovisual Desire: Scopophilia in Der Tod in Venedig by Thomas Mann.
Peter Hutchinson is exceptional in addressing the enquiries into Mann's homosexuality, a topic, to be sure, not easily evaded in an essay on Der Tod in Venedig.
Such is the case when he categorizes Der Tod in Venedig as "a summation of Mann's early career, a final novella that rehearses one more time Mann's deepest preoccupations, while pointing the way toward a new interest in myth," and then little more than a page later characterizes an aspect of the same story as simultaneously elevating "his story of homosexual passion into a timeless classical myth" (47, 51).
Although occasionally resorting to tentative speculation where our knowledge is still patchy, Fehervary never overstretches the available evidence and, in setting Seghers's text beside Die Verwandlung and Der Tod in Venedig as an indisputable masterpiece, names its author one of the great modernists of her time.
Contrary to Adorno's emphasis on the composer's minimal function in the creative process, Der Tod in Venedig figures subjective thoughts and feelings as the source of creativity.