Death in Venice

(redirected from Der Tod in Venedig)

Death in Venice

aging successful author loses his lifelong self-discipline in his love for a beautiful Polish boy. [Ger. Lit: Death in Venice]
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, in her first chapter, Wickerson offers close readings of moments of pictorial description in Der Zauberberg and Der Tod in Venedig to illustrate a greater sense of temporal movement than the apparent stasis of description would imply.
In Thomas Mann's Der Tod in Venedig, Gustav von Aschenbach, nationally acclaimed and recently ennobled author, is swept away by a sudden pang of Wanderlust sparked by a homoerotically charged exchange of stares with an unknown man in a park.
Thomas Mann (1875-1955), escritor aleman nacionalizado esta-dunidense, escribio en 1912 la novela corta Der Tod in Venedig (Muerte en Venecia), una de sus mejores obras, llevada a la pantalla en 1971 por el cineasta italiano Luchino Visconti conde de Lonate Pozzolo (1906-1976) como Morte a Venizia, resulto mucho mas melodramatica que la novela, en virtud de algunos cambios introducidos por Visconti: el protagonista Gustav von Aschenbach interpretado por Dirk Bogarde no es escritor sino un compositor, inspirado en Gustav Mahler, cuya musica se escucha a lo largo del filme, en especial el hermoso Adagietto de la Quinta Sinfonia.
But he is also acutely aware that the theme of lateness saturates all of Mann's writing and so he frequently refers back to earlier works, especially Der Tod in Venedig. At the centre, though, is Doktor Faustus, because Mann himself regarded the works that came afterward as the writings of a man who had outlived himself, late works.
After publication of the novellas Kroger, Tonio and Tristan (both 1903), he took up the tragic dilemma of the artist with Der Tod in Venedig (1912; Death in Venice), a somber masterpiece.
(Der Tod in Venedig, 1912; translated as 1925) A novella by Thomas Mann.
But Mann's allusions to the dangers of intoxication are not limited--in time or subject matter--to his engagement with fascism: predating "Mario und der Zauberer" by more than fifteen years, Der Tod in Venedig, in which Aschenbach's desire for young Tadzio plunges him into a delirious haze, anticipates an ethically inflected treatment of intoxication that becomes much more pronounced in his later works.
Excellent examples of the former are Ehrhard Bahr's essay on art and society in Mann's early novellas and Clayton Koelb's discussion of Der Tod in Venedig, both of which present lucid expositions of the texts together with introductions to the interpretative issues which have traditionally surrounded them.
Dierks, as often before, asserts as a fact that when writing Der Tod in Venedig Mann not only read but studied Freud's essay Der Wahn unddie Traume in W.
There is a strange gap apropos Der Tod in Venedig. In a reference work so thorough that it even reports people's unsuccessful efforts to trace the Mary Smith with whom Mann had some kind of romance in Florence in 1901, there is no word of a much more important figure, the well-documented model for Tadzio, Baron Wladyslaw Moes--Adzio, as the family called him.
The themes of aging and masculinity have found only limited interest in analyses of "Der Tod in Venedig." This is particularly surprising, given the fact that Mann himself referred to Gustav Aschenbach as "alternden Kunstler" (21: 477) and explained that, feeling the need to confer a naturalistic dimension to his hero's decline, "[um] den 'Fall' auch pathologisch zu sehen," he introduced "dies Motiv (Klimakterium)" (22: 349).