Derceto

Derceto

nature deity; became mermaid when Mopsus pursued her. [Philistine Myth.: Jobes, 433; Avery, 389]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Clearly, some of the early and wonderfully fanciful maps show fantasy was the stuff of life to men such as Kircher (and Leonardo Da Vinci not to mention Michelangelo) so it is no surprise to find a scaly goddess called Derceto haunting the lonely marshes of ancient Palestine.
It calls Piscis Austrinus the Great Fish and links it with Derceto, a Syrian mother goddess whose cult was headquartered at Bambyke (or Hieropolis).
Derceto's temple hosted a sacred pool stocked with sacred fish.
According to Hyginus, Piscis Austrinus saved Isis "when she was in distress." Isis is just the Hellenistic Mediterranean version of Derceto. Her counterparts in the ancient world included Ishtar in Babylon, Assyria's Belit, Astarte and Asherah in Canaan, the Ugaritic Anat, Magna Mater in Phrygia, both Venus and Juno in Rome, Aphrodite or Hera in Greece, and more.
Informing us that the Southern Fish once saved the goddess Derceto from drowning, the Catasterismi's entry for Piscis Austrinus adds a little, but our catch is still way below the limit.
Derceto is the ancient Greek name for Atargatis, Syria's Great Mother Goddess, the fertile spirit of cyclical renewal.
The stories are also essentially consistent with the Catasterismi, for Derceto was said to be the daughter of Aphrodite.