Dermacentor

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Dermacentor

[′dər·mə‚sen·tər]
(invertebrate zoology)
A genus of ticks, important as vectors of disease.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ear tick, Otobius megnini, like Dermacentor albipictus, is a one-host tick.
Another common tick associated with white-tailed deer in middle Tennessee is the winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus Packard).
Mortality of healthy larvae of Dermacentor albipictus after 10 days exposed to spores (1.6 x [10.sup.8] spores/larva) from wallow soil fungi from Greenville, Maine, USA.
1994: Growth of moose calves (Alces alces americana) infested and unifested with winter ticks (Dermacentor albipictus).--Canadian Journal of Zoology 72: 1469-1476.
Winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus) ecology and transmission in Elk Island National Park, Alberta.
In northern New England, winter ticks (Dermacentor albipictus) are suspected to influence the population through periodic widespread mortality of calves during epizootics (Musante et al.
Multiple parasites and diseases including the arterial worm (Elaeophora schneideri), winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus), giant liver fluke (Fascioloides magna), chronic wasting disease, hydatid worm (Echinococcus granulosus), and other tapeworms (Taenia spp.) have been documented in the region from examination of hunter-killed, live-captured, or opportunistically collected specimens of moose or other ungulate species (e.g., Worley et al.
Key words: Dermacentor albipictus, winter tick, moose, recruitment, weather, habitat, Alces
2013) and cumulative effects of stressors such as morbidity and mortality from parasites including the winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus) (Rempel 2011).
There was a slight increase in physical characteristics of yearlings that contrasted with the trend in New Hampshire and Vermont where it is speculated that parasitism by winter ticks (Dermacentor albipictus) reduces growth rate and recruitment by yearlings.
The winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus) is a unique blood-feeding ectoparasite that periodically causes severe mortality in moose (Alces alces) populations (Cameron and Fulton 1926-27, Samuel and Barker 1979).