Dermestidae


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Dermestidae

[dər′mes·tə·dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The skin beetles, a family of coleopteran insects in the superfamily Dermestoidea, including serious pests of stored agricultural grain products.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Dermestidae

 

a family of beetles. The body, which measures 2–12 mm long, is flat-cylindrical or oval and has short claviform antennae. The larvae are mobile, elongated, greatly chitinous, with long protruding hairs. There are approximately 800 species, distributed throughout the world. In the USSR there are 90 species, most of which are found in the southern regions. Dermestids feed on dry animal and plant substances; some eat pollen and are found on flowers. Many species do great damage to fur, leather, carpets, smoked and dried meat or fish, zoological collections, dried fruits, dried medicinal plants, and herbariums. The most destructive species are the larder beetle (Dermestes lardarius), Attagenus pellio, and the museum beetle (Anthrenus museorum). The khapra beetle (Trogoderma granarium) harms stored grain. Control measures are primarily prophylactic; they include quarantine (in the case of the khapra beetle) and fumigating storage areas with gas.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wang, "The toxic effects of Perilla frutescens essential oils in combination with C[O.sub.2]-enriched modified atmospheres on the life stages of Dermestes maculatus Degeer (Coleoptera: Dermestidae)," Turkiye Entomoloji Dergisi, vol.
Effect of temperature and humidity on the biology of Attagenus fasciatus (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Dermestidae).
The dermestid beetles (Dermestidae) were captured by hand on the sixth day of sampling which is earlier than reported in other decomposition research also conducted in non arid environments (Rodriguez and Bass, 1983, Hewadikaram and Goff, 1991).
[5.] Cohen E Fatty acid synthesis by the Hide beetle Dermestes maculatus (Dermestidae: Coleoptera) Ent.
Coleopterans secondarily colonize the resource and include species from the following families: Histeridae, Staphylinidae, Silphidae and Dermestidae (Payne, 1965; Byrd and Castner, 2010).
Coleoptera Dermestidae Dermestes maculatus De Geer Cleridae Necrobia rufipes De Geer Lepidoptera Tineidae Tineola sp.
The different groups that are dealt with in detail include mites from the family Cunaxidae, pseudoscorpions (Pseudoscorpionides), springtails (Collembola), booklice (Psocoptera), earwigs (Dermaptera), beetles (Coleoptera) belonging to some 17 different families, including such important ones as the ground beetles (Carabidae), hide and carpet beetles (Dermestidae), blister beetles (Meloidae) and weevils (Curculionoidea).
Dermestes ater (DeGeer 1774) (Coleoptera, Dermestidae) feeds and scavenges on animal products.