rate of climb

(redirected from Descent rate)

rate of climb

[′rāt əv ′klīm]
(aerospace engineering)
Ascent of aircraft per unit time, usually expressed as feet per minute.

rate of climb

The rate of gain of vertical height per unit of time (i.e., feet/minute or meters/second). The rate of climb is normally calculated when an aircraft is climbing at its specified climbing speed and not in zoom climb. In helicopters, there are two rates of climb: the maximum rate of climb and the maximum vertical rate of climb. A vertical speed indicator (VSI) shows the rate of climb.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aircraft states that govern the symmetrical landing are mass state, vertical descent rate, pitch angle, pitch rate, pitch acceleration, vertical and longitudinal accelerations [5].
When the pilot corrected, the electric trim started to run nose down and the aircraft's descent rate increased.
However, the descent rate after the final step-down fix (ERRIK) to the runway is quite steep to land straight in on Runway 30, even if a left base entry is made--about 3400 feet of altitude in about 6 miles.
As the target's turn rate increased, its descent rate and airspeed also increased.
Data collected from these tests will be used to verify the parachute inflation characteristics and landing system performance, as well as the altitude and descent rate of the Starliner at touchdown.
As with any air vehicle, and a parachute must be considered as such, gross weight is a key determinant of the descent rate, which itself is a compromise between a highly desirable soft landing and the tendency of the parachute to drift: A simple rule-of-thumb is that the lower the descent rate, the greater the parachutes' drift from its intended landing spot.
The jet attempted a go-around maneuver and subsequently encountered a headwind, climbing to a height of only 85 feet before sinking back onto the runway at a descent rate of 900 feet a minute.
The geometrical design of the tunnel was validated by national and foreign experts, which determined particular operation considerations such as maximum speeds, i.e., ascent rate of 50 km/h for all kind of vehicles, 30 km/h descent rate for service vehicles and 50 km/h descent rate for buses and light vehicles.
Our aircraft got momentarily lower than desired at times while on final approach due to the illusion, despite the altitude and descent rate callouts.
Beal also set the descent rate for that runway too high _ 1,500 feet (457 meters) of altitude per minute rather than the recommended 1,000 feet (305 meters).
For instance, during the rover separation, they had to prevent the flight hardware from clashing or coming into contact with each other during the “two body phase” of the Descent Rate Limiter (DLR)/bridle deployment.