deschooling


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deschooling

arrangements to replace institutionalized forms of education in schools. Deschooling arguments were popular in both the US and the UK in the late 1960s and early 1970s, developing from the general cynicism and dissatisfaction expressed at that time with the nature of industrial society and the growing concentration of political and economic power. Schools came to be seen as agencies of a social system which legitimated the pursuit of qualifications at the expense of individual development. Writers such as ILLICH (1971), Reimer (1971) and Goodman (1956) suggested that schools converted liberal and humane purposes into repressive outcomes. They believed that, at the very least, schools play no more than a custodial role; at the very worst they are coercive. Pupils are socialized into dominant ideologies, understanding their own futures in competitive terms. Obedience to teachers and the lessons of the HIDDEN CURRICULUM prepare pupils for different places of work. Schools claim an educational monopoly and devalue all other forms of non-school knowledge. Such forms of schooling are detrimental to genuine forms of education and should therefore be replaced by alternatives. Suggested alternatives ranged from travelling teachers, on the old European ‘friar’ model, through information exchange networks, dependent on telephones and computers, in the US, to the establishment of schools outside the state and conventional private sector in the UK.

There was a very mixed reception for such ideas. In some cases they were enthusiastically accepted; in others they were reviled. The ideas can be criticized for their oversimplification of the relations of schools to society, although deschooling has value in its challenge to the idea that schooling is a ‘good thing’. However, in denouncing all that is wrong in schools, it has ignored that which is successful. It remains arguable that those on whose behalf deschoolers speak would actually be gainers if conventional and traditional forms of schooling were abandoned.

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"There is remarkable diversity in the composition of the deschooling movement.
Robinson isn't the first to bring up the point that splitting hand (technical education) and brain (academic education) hampers the rounded development of the individual, and was originally driven by the needs of the industrial system, it is a persistent theme in a countercultural tradition that runs from the young Marx (1846) through William Morris (1890), John Ruskin (1862), Peter Kropotkin (1898), right up to Ivan Illich's seminal book, Deschooling Society (1971), and most recently Kirkpatrick-Sale's latest restatement of the bioregional vision in The Human Scale Revisited (2017).
There's a part of me who thinks that there was an active effort to engage in deschooling in the aftermath of the protest against the Vietnam War.
Learning in informal contexts has often been regarded as the opposite of formal education and critical toward traditions as is depicted in Ivan Illich's [34] classical presentation Deschooling Society.
There have been challenges as well to the goals of education, the most revolutionary being that posed by Ivan Illich's Deschooling Society, which was first published in 1971.
Deschooling international education: Toward an alternative paradigm of practice.
I want to place in opposition to this smooth accelerated image of technology in post-capitalist, post-terrestrial space an idea of "decapitalism" rather than "anti-capitalism," the latter too tainted by Srnicek and Williams's dismissive critique of "the folk politics of localism, direct action and relentless horizontalism." (9) What I am proposing as "decapitalism" is linguistically and conceptually like Illich's idea of "deschooling," but also similar to "decolonization": the point is to take back what is left, along with the technologies that have contributed to despoliation and exploitation, and turn them back against this same destruction.
Scholars have been addressing the need for educational paradigm change (see Robinson, 2010) for some time (e.g., John Dewey's [1916/1966] progressive education; Paulo Freire's [1970/1993] vision of popular education; Ivan Illich's [1971] deschooling of society; William Pinar and Madelaine Grumet's [1976] reconceptualization of curriculum as "currere;" Jacques Rancier's [1991] ignorant schoolmaster; Ted Aoki's [1991] inspiriting curriculum; Maxine Greene's [1995] emphasis on imagination and creativity).
In Jen Currin's accomplished fourth collection, the West Coast poet considers the diverse ways we are "schooled" and school others--and what "deschooling" (in the spirit of Simone Weil/Anne Carson's "decreation") could mean.
(Perhaps we should dust off Ivan Illich's Deschooling Society (1971).