Desiderius


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Desiderius

(dēsĭdēr`ēəs), d. after 774, last Lombard king in Italy (756–74). The duke of Tuscany, he was chosen king with the support of the pope and of Pepin the Short, who was king of the Franks and whose son Charles (later Emperor Charlemagne) married Desiderius's daughter. Desiderius's alliance with his son-in-law Duke Tassilo of Bavaria and his subsequent interference in Roman affairs incensed Charlemagne, who repudiated (771) his wife and provoked open conflict. Desiderius responded by supporting the claims of the children of Charlemagne's brother Carloman (d. 771), by attacking Pope Adrian IAdrian I,
d. 795, pope (772–95), a Roman; successor of Stephen IV. At Adrian's urging, Charlemagne crossed the Alps and defeated the Lombard king, Desiderius, who had annexed papal territory. That defeat marked the end of the Lombard kingdom.
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, and by occupying several papal cities. Charlemagne invaded (773) Italy, captured (774) Desiderius at Pavia after a long siege, and proclaimed himself king of the Lombards. Desiderius was forced to retire to a monastery at Liège.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Among his poetic works of that period are an itinerary of his journey to Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam; a short preface to the Enchiridion Christiani militis; elegies in praise and defense of the evangelical doctor Martin Luther; a consolation to that most illustrious prince, William Duke of Brunswick etc.
King Sisebut and the culture of Visigothic Spain, with translations of the lives of Saint Desiderius of Vienne and Saint Masona of Merida.
Now, thanks to Radding and Newton, we can see the crucial role played by Alberic at the council, along with his abbot Desiderius, as they sought to quell this eucharistic controversy for the sake of Gregory VII's reform program.
It was a familiar Sentiment in early Tudor England: despite the protests of a few humanists such as Desiderius Erasmus and Sir Thomas More, hunting was deemed by most to be not only a symbol of knighthood, but an activity that marked out the true gentleman.
The result is not one portrait of the "real" Desiderius Erasmus, but multiple vignettes; these are so varied in the way they view and assess Erasmus that the result at times verges on a complete relativism.
The largest group of papers are in Section III, "Literature and Philosophy in the Renaissance Republic of Letters": "Polidoro Virgili, Erasmo e la Respublica litteraria," by Romano Ruggieri; "Erasmus and Plagiarism," by Ari Wessling; "Indus elephantus haudcurat culicem: Erasme et Dolet (1528-38)," by Catherine Langlois-Pezeret; "Concorde et polemique dans les Colloques d'Erasme," by Beatrice Perigot; "The Erasmian Republic of Letters and Its Discontents," by Hanan Yoran; "Enjeux de la traduction du grec et latin dans la Respublica litteraria autour d'Erasme," by Isabelle Diu; and "Two Models of Humanist Letter-Writing: Desiderius Erasmus and Justus Lipsius," by Jeanine de Landtsheer.
He focuses his study of the approach to the work of 16th-century scholars Desiderius Erasmus and Theodorus Beza, asking what kind of conjectures they made, what role conjectural emendation play in their work on the New Testament, and in what particular view of the text their conjectures can be understood.
He rightly singles out Friedhelm Kruger's Humanistische Evangeliensauslegung: Desiderius Erasmus von Rotterdam als Ausleger der Evangelien in seinen Paraphrasen (1986) as the "first full-length study of the Paraphrases" as well as a "pioneering extended study." Yet the terse comment that Kruger has "not escaped the trap of oversystematization" is hardly fair when attributed without elaboration to his important book (146).
Desiderius Erasmus, whose publication of the Adages, pearls of wisdom culled from the classics, in 1500, marked him out as the rising star of northern humanism, visited England in 1499 and struck up a lasting friendship with the young Thomas More.
This 47th volume in the complete works of Dutch Catholic humanist philosopher Desiderius Erasmus (1466-1536) is the eighth within "ordo" IX, the ordo of the Apologiae.
Against a background of monastic buildings, Abbot Desiderius (later Pope Victor III [1086-87]), is depicted standing next to a pile of books, presenting the lectionary to a seated St.
This 46th volume in the complete works of humanist philosopher Desiderius Erasmus (1466-1536) is the seventh within "ordo" nine, that is, the ordo of the </Apologiae/>.