Design for disassembly


Also found in: Acronyms.

Design for disassembly

A design that facilitates future change and the eventual dismantlement, in part or whole, for recovery of systems, components, and materials. This design process includes developing the assemblies, components, materials, construction techniques, and information and management systems to accomplish this goal.
References in periodicals archive ?
"High-Stiffness, Lock-and-Key Heat-Reversible Locator-Snap Systems for the Design for Disassembly," M.
However, design for disassembly and EoL processing are not so well established or understood.
This requirement for design for disassembly was sometimes unintentionally achieved through design for assembly: "In terms of companies applying it, I think many of them are doing it as part of the design process they go through, sometimes without recognising it, because they are designing for assembly.
Along with traditional design criteria such as cost, quality, and performance, IBM design engineers are asked to optimize product and process design by emphasizing a litany of DFE-related characteristics, including design for disassembly, recyclability, and reuse of the product; use of recycled materials; reduction in the use of natural and energy resources; design and manufacture without producing hazardous waste; the use of clean manufacturing technologies; reduction in product chemical emissions and in product energy production; the use of identifiable or recyclable plastics and of recyclable or nonhazardous metals.
While the demonstration project has given us guidance and direction, it only paves the way for more in-depth programs in the future, including design for disassembly."
Chapter titles include: "Rapid Guidelines for Joining of Plastics," "Designing for Efficient Assembly," "Cost Reduction in Assembly," "Design for Disassembly and Recycling," "Assembly Method Selection by Material," "Assembly Method Selection by Process," "Adhesive and Solvent Joining," "Fasteners and Inserts," "Hinges," "Hot Plate/Hot Die/Fusion and Hot Wire/Resistance Welding," "Hot Gas Welding," "Induction/Electromagnetic Welding," "Insert and Multipart Molding," "Press Fits/Force Fits/Interface Fits/Shrink Fits," "Snap Fits," "Spin Welding," "Staking/Swaging/Peening/Cold Heading/Cold Forming," "Threads: Tapped and Molded-in," "Ultrasonic Welding," and "Vibration Welding."
And GE's Jack Avery recommends that captive processors, in particular, should "design for disassembly and resource recovery, and work to establish materials recovery mechanisms."

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