Dessert Wines


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Dessert Wines

 

beverages prepared by incomplete alcoholic fermentation of the juice of grapes (and other fruits and berries) and the addition of sugar. They contain from 12 to 17 percent alcohol by volume, including not less than 1.2 percent alcohol (by volume) produced by natural fermentation; their sugar content is from 5 to 12 percent for semisweet and 14 to 20 percent for sweet wines, and from 21 to 35 percent for liqueurs. Sweet wines and liqueurs are made from grapes of high saccharinity from a late harvest. To raise the sugar content it is permissible to introduce concentrated grape must. For halting the fermentation and maintaining the needed saccharinity, alcohol is added. Dessert wines include Tokays, Cahors, Malaga, sweet ports, and muscatels.

REFERENCES

Vinodelie. Simferopol’, 1960.
Gerasimov, M. A. Tekhnologiia vina, 3rd ed. Moscow, 1964.
Vinodelie, Moscow, 1969.
Okhremenko, N. S. Luchshie vina i kon’iaki SSSR. Moscow, 1970.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Taste the Difference Sauternes (PS14, Sainsbury) is a lusciously sweet dessert wine full of Seville oranges, apricot and a seam of lemon; it has lip-licking apricot and honeycomb flavours which flatter and flirt with cheese.
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An outstanding way to do this is to skillfully present a dessert wine or other luscious alcoholic beverage after the main course.
The fruity dessert wines now have fancier names such as Cassis (black currant), Framboise (raspberry), Logan (loganberry) and Oro (hazelnut).
Until, that is, you need to shut them down or get rid of them in mid-stream--to bring a dessert wine fermentation to a controlled stop, for example, or get the yeast dregs out of the neck of a sparkling wine bottle.
Restaurateurs, therefore might be well advised to consider promoting the sales of dessert wines and then offering their customers a special pot of coffee, either French Press, or brewed to order (at a very special price) to conclude the meal.
Not least because the greater emphasis these days is on dry wine and dessert wines are often dismissed as unpalatable.
If you're after a dessert wine, why not try Lenz Moser's Prestige Beerenauslese 1995?
But pairing the two rarely works - even with dessert wines.
Dessert wines can be so intriguing and rich, don't be surprised if they start to replace your favourite pudding.
The grapes harvested even later and selected by the individual bunch become dessert wines of great complexity.
Non-fortified dessert wines are also relatively resistant to deterioration.