Detinets

Detinets

 

the inner fortification in a medieval Russian city; it protected with walls and towers the prince’s residence and the court of high church officials. The term detinets is used in the chronicles up until the 14th century, when it is replaced by the name kremV (kremlin) or by the words for “city”—grad and gorod —which were in use at the same time.

References in periodicals archive ?
The widest variety of curved bricks can be seen in the church of the Entry of Our Lord into Jerusalem in Novgorodian Detinets (1336-1337)--at that monument master builders used bricks with triangular, splay butt-ends and semi-circular ends, and bricks with a semi-circular hollow--a part of brick window frames.
A number of them oversaw construction of the Detinets walls and of non-ecclesiastical buildings within the Detinets.
Theodore over one of the Detinets gates leading north into the Nerev End in 1233, although it is not clear that this was an archiepiscopal construction.
Bernadskii notes the Detinets (or "Kremlin," as he calls it) was built in stone in 1331, the first year of Vasilii's archiepiscopate (Novgorod, 25).
The first part of Feoktist's consecration occurred in the Church of Boris and Gleb in the Detinets (the Novgorod Kremlin).