Deucalion


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Related to Deucalion: Pyrrha

Deucalion

(dyo͞okā`lēən), in Greek mythology, son of Prometheus and father of Hellen. When Zeus, angered by humanity's irreverence, flooded the earth, Deucalion, warned by Prometheus, survived by taking refuge with his wife, Pyrrha, in an ark. Later, an oracle told them to cast behind them the bones of their mother (i.e., the stones of the earth). From these stones sprang men and women who repopulated the world.

Deucalion

on Prometheus’ advice, survived flood in ark. [Gk. Myth.: Gaster, 84–85]
See: Escape

Deucalion

survived Zeus’s flood in ark. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmer-man, 85]
See: Rescue

Deucalion

survives flood that destroys human race. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 80]
References in periodicals archive ?
When the earth is repopulated after the flood, Deucalion and Pyrrha toss stones (the "bones" of mother earth) behind them that begin to take on human form, "not well defined, but like roughed-out statues." (21) Thus, in both the pre- and post- flood worlds that Ovid describes, the statue motif plays a crucial role in establishing the connection of the spiritual and material in human form: humans are earth and stone formed in the image of the gods and brought to life by some divine spark, the very miracle celebrated in ekphrasis.
They even manage to put several bullets in Deucalion's chest.
However, it escaped your attention that our president was throwing stones over his shoulders --as Deucalion did in Greek mythology- to increase the number of his supporters who were eulogised by the Archbishop so that the he can safeguard their votes in the coming presidential elections.
Deucalion Stephanos (Stephan) is the thirteen year-old son of King Minos of Crete and it is through him that the tale is told.
(41) John Ruskin, "Yewdale and Its Streamlets," delivered in 1877, in Deucalion, in Works, 26: 265.