DSM

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DSM

(1)
Data Structure Manager.

An object-oriented language by J.E. Rumbaugh and M.E. Loomis of GE, similar to C++. It is used in implementation of CAD/CAE software. DSM is written in DSM and C and produces C as output.

["DSM: An Object-Relationship Modeling Language", A. Shah et al, SIGPLAN Notices 24(10):191-202 (OOPSLA '89) (Oct 1989)].

DSM

(2)
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
(3.) American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed.
The book explores the psychological aspects of functioning, disability and health as conceptualised by the World Health Organisation's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and disorders as diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Readers will learn the effectiveness of the ICFs biopsychosocial approach for conceptualising and classifying mental health functioning (body functions and structures), disability (activity, limitations and participation restrictions), environmental barriers, and facilitators; collaborating with the person who is being assessed in determining these factors (personal factors), targeting interventions, and evaluating treatment efficacy.
Sulzer carried out her interviews of mental health workers shortly before the release of the latest manual of psychiatric disorders, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM-5 (SN: 6/29/13, p.
Psychotherapists from the US, Canada, Europe, and Australia address the history of narcissism; its features, including interpersonal problems, affect regulation and mentalization, intrapsychic conflicts and defenses, suicide risk, and sex and race-ethnic differences in co-occurring disorders; diagnosis, subtypes, and assessment using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual, and Pathological Narcissism Inventory; and treatment considerations, including countertransference issues, maintaining boundaries, transference-focused psychotherapy, Kohut's self psychology approach, short-term dynamic psychotherapy, schema therapy, and cognitive behavioral perspectives.
Her first task was to define the disorder, and to do this she took as her basis the 4th version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders of the American Psychiatric Association.
The American Psychiatric Association, which is in the process of revising its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) is considering removing the word "disorder" from "post-traumatic stress disorder" in response to a request from the Army, according to a Jan.
And the federal definition of mental illness is usually interpreted to include all disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR).
Only with the adaptation of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition did the mental health community recognize that adult anxiety disorders have origins in childhood, notes Emslie, the first psychiatrist to demonstrate that antidepressants are effective in depressed children and adolescents.
The more resistant the individual and the stronger the individual circumstances meet the criteria relative to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text revision), the more likely that intervention is required (American Psychiatric Association, 2000b).
The American Psychiatric Association removed homosexuality from its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 1973.
According to the 1994 edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (commonly abbreviated DSMV-IV and often referred to as the bible of psychiatry), "There are no laboratory tests that have been established as diagnostic in the clinical assessment of [ADHD]." Nor are there any "specific physical features associated with" the disorder, which means that in making their diagnoses about the need for Ritalin, physicians must rely largely on the ambiguous criteria enunciated in DSMV-IV, supplemented by subjective reports from various so-called experts.
(10.) As defined by the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV).

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