diamond anvil

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diamond anvil

[′dī·mənd ′an·vəl]
(engineering)
A brilliant-cut diamond of extremely high quality that is modified to have 16 sides and has the culet cut off to create either a flat tip or a flat surface followed by a bevel of 5-10°.
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In situ synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analysis of aqueous fluids in a modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell was used to determine the solubility of synthetic Mo[O.sub.2] in pure water up to 800[degrees]C and 480 MPa.
Scientists who conduct palm-sized diamond anvil cell experiments refuse to be left out of the liquid-metal action.
The diamond anvil cell pyrolysis of kerogen has the potential to observe the transformation of organic matter of kerogen and reveal many important processes during its heat treatment, which are not recognized using conventional pyrolysis techniques.
Here we present a method for the immediate detection of a melting event visually observable in laser-heated diamond anvil cells and demonstrate its experimental application on melting gold, iron and hematite ([Fe.sup.2][O.sup.3]) samples under static high-pressure conditions.
So, laser heating combined with diamond anvil cell is needed in the amorphous-to-perovskite phase transition study of [Mg.sub.3][Y.sub.2][(Si[O.sub.4]).sub.3] for further research.
Barbara Lavina of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and colleagues synthesized this compound in a diamond anvil cell by smooshing a different compound made of iron, carbon and oxygen.
Key words: crystallography; diamond anvil cell (DAC); high pressure; hydrostaticity; polycrystalline; ruby pressure measurement; single crystal.
For more than half a century the diamond anvil cell or DAC has been the primary tool to create static high pressures to study the physics and chemistry of materials under those extreme conditions, for example to explore the physical properties of materials at the center of the Earth at 3.5 million atmospheres, said lead author Zsolt Jenei from LLNL.
In their experiment, Silvera and his colleague Ranga Dias used a device known as a diamond anvil cell and subjected a tiny hydrogen sample to a pressure of 495 gigapascals - greater than the pressure at the centre of the Earth. As the researchers explained in the study, at these pressures, solid molecular hydrogen breaks down, and the tightly bound molecules transform into atomic hydrogen, which is a metal.
Instead, the team used a device known as a diamond anvil cell to heat sulphur-rich fluids to temperatures and pressures comparable to those 10-100 kilometres below the surface, using infrared Raman spectroscopy to monitor the types of chemical produced.
A synthetic crystal called moissanite has squeezed in on diamond's role as the jaws of a powerful experimental device known as a diamond anvil cell.
Tenders invited for Supply of symmetric type diamond anvil cell and its accessories