Diamondback Moth


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Diamondback Moth

 

(Plutella maculipennis), a butterfly of the family Plutellidae, injurious to cruciferpus plants. Wing-span, 14–17 mm. The anterior wings are grayish or blackish brown with a wavy white stripe on the interior edge; the posterior wings are gray with a long fringe. The caterpillar is 9–12 mm long, spindle-shaped, and green. The eggs are pale yellow. The diamondback moth is distributed throughout the world. It does most damage to cabbage and rutabaga plants. There are between one and eight generations each year; the chrysalides winter on cruciferous weeds, stumps, and leaves. The moths emerge between April and June. One to three eggs are laid on the underside of leaves or on stems. The caterpillars first penetrate into the leaf tissue. They subsequently appear on the leaf surface, eating “little windows” in the leaves. Measures taken against the diamond-back moth include destruction of weeds, tillage of harvest remains, and treatment of plants with insecticides and the microbiological preparation entobacterin.

References in periodicals archive ?
The main effect investigated was the ovipositional preference of the diamondback moth, as determined by counting the number of eggs laid on each rapeseed cultivar.
html), "Integrated Pest Management of Diamondback Moth in the Bajio, Mexico," was established in August 1996.
It is also consistent with declines in resistance that occur when diamondback moth populations are not exposed to B.
Also we measured the electrophysiological responsiveness of ORNs in trichoid sensilla to a panel of synthetic host and non-host volatile compounds by SSR to determine the types of ORNs and the sensitivity and selectiv ity of each trichoid sensillum found on the antennae of diamondback moth females.
Monitoring resistance of field populations of diamondback moth Plutella xylostella L.
Suppression of diamondback moth (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) with an entomopathogenic nematode (Rhabditida: Steinernematidae) and Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner.
Each year, natural baculovirus epidemics nearly wipe out populations of some caterpillar pests, such as corn earworm, cotton bollworm, tobacco budworm, and cabbage's nemesis--the diamondback moth," says ARS microbiologist Arthur H.
The diamondback moth became the first insect pest to develop resistance to the environmentally friendly microbial biopesticide Bacillus thuringiensis (Tabashnik et al.
Local variation in susceptibility of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus) to insecticides and role of detoxification enzymes.