diapir

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diapir

[′dī·ə‚pir]
(geology)
A dome or anticlinal fold in which a mobile plastic core has ruptured the more brittle overlying rock. Also known as diapiric fold; piercement dome; piercing fold.
References in periodicals archive ?
1992), it is also broadly parallel to the trend of the salt-cored Minudie Anticline and may record paleoflow deflection by the diapir.
Diapirs may have been formed due to diapir-inducing load caused by glacier ice and/or earlier deposited thick overburden.
Although rising magma isn't unusual in itself, a diapir's circumstances are unique.
Glauberite molds are uncommon outside of the cavities in diapirs. Within the pockets of the lower and middle amygdaloidal horizons, quartz, datolite and albite have covered glauberite, leaving behind rectangular epimorphs as hollow shells.
The EFG is a deep reef atop a salt diapir (Bright & Powell 1983, Gardner et al.
Ainsi, l'ascension de diapirs a partir d'une grande accumulation de magma moins dense que l'encaissant est-il un phenomene important dans la croute inferieure ductile.
The location of each whale shark sighting was plotted on navigational charts, produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Chart numbers 11006, 11300, 11340), to examine the associations of whale sharks with bathymetric features such as reefs and salt diapirs. Statistical tests were preformed according to the methods of Zar (1999) at a significance level of P [less than or equal to] 0.05.
Although some questions remain concerning their formation and evolution, they are generally considered to be the result of rising plumes of magma (diapirs) which reach the surface, push the crust upward, and then collapse (like a badly cooked souffle) after the diapir cools (Basilevsky and Head, 2003).
The petrographic sequences in these sediments include saline deposits: diapirs of evaporites, salt bearing marls, gypsum, anhydrite, etc.
The linear contacts generally correspond to faults, whereas the contacts of circular form are the limits of the diapirs or intrusive bodies.
Recent ocean drilling penetration of serpentine diapirs and volcanoes in the Mariana forearc (leading edge of the Eurasian plate, in the Philippine Sea) documents intermixed blocks of mid-ocean ridge basalt and blueschist.
The slope is being extensively deformed by a mass of salt diapirs, or rising domes, which is wedging itself between layers of mud as it flows downslope.