Diaspididae


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Diaspididae

 

a family of homopteran insects of the suborder Coccoidea. The insects measure as much as 2 mm in length and have a waxy carapace. Sexual dimorphism is marked. The females lack wings and legs, while the males, which are smaller than the females, have one pair of wings, normally developed extremities, and reduced mouth organs. The larvae and adult females suck the juices of plants.

The family embraces approximately 1,300 species, which are distributed throughout the globe, mainly in warm latitudes. The USSR has about 130 species. The Diaspididae live in trees and shrubs and occasionally on herbaceous plants. Many species are pests of citrus, apple, plum, peach, and mulberry trees.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
lingnanensis son cosmopolitas y son los parasitoides de Diaspididae mas polifagos; los registros de sus hospederos en el mundo incluyen 60, 26, 40 y 24 hemipteros, respectivamente.
Tomando como referencia lo citado por ser este individuo de la familia Diaspididae, se puede decir que los registros de las Figuras 5 y 6 coinciden con lo mencionado por estos autores.
Of these, Aspidiotus destructor or coconut scale insects in the family Diaspididae were reported to be the most serious pest (Mohyuddin, 1981).
The armored scale insects of Ohio (Homoptera: Coccoidea: Diaspididae) Bulletin of the Ohio Biological Survey 2.
Biologie du pou noir de l'oranger Parlatoria ziziphi (Hemiptera ; Diaspididae) et l'impacte de son parasitoideEncarcia citrinus (Hymenoptera - Aphelinidae) dans la regulation de son niveau d'infestation sur clementinier en Mitidja (Algerie).
Fossil scale insects (Hemiptera, Coccoidea, Diaspididae) in life position on an angiosperm leaf from an Early Miocene lake deposit, Otago, New Zealand.
Seasonal development of the California red scale (Homoptera: Diaspididae) in San Joaquin Valley citrus based on degree-day accumulation.