diatomic

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diatomic

(of a compound or molecule)
a. containing two atoms
b. containing two characteristic groups or atoms
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

diatomic

[¦dī·ə′täm·ik]
(chemistry)
Consisting of two atoms.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the vibration-rotation motion of a diatomic molecule is described by the wave function [[PSI].sub.vJ] and the energy [E.sub.vJ] that are, respectively, the eigenfunction and the eigenvalue of the radial Schrodinger equation [18]
CO has been classified with other biologically active diatomic molecules, such as nitrogen oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulphide (H2S), as a gasotransmitter [1].
Moist air is a mixture of air (itself composed primarily of diatomic molecules, notably [N.sub.2] and [O.sub.2]) and water vapor ([H.sub.2]O).
The basic model of our study considers a diatomic molecule immersed in an atomic solvent as a quantum rotor (small system S) coupled with the translational degrees of freedom of both the diatomic and the solvent (the bath B) by means of the anisotropic potential [6]
In conclusions, we have investigated the classical limit in the photo-detachment of homo-nuclear diatomic negative ion using two-center-model calculations and by simply equating probability densities from two coherent sources to the probability density from the diatomic molecule negative ion.
M., Diatomic molecule according to wave mechanics, Vibrational levels, Phys.
Chen, "Approximate analytical solution of continuous states for the l-wave Schrodinger equation with a diatomic molecule potential," Central European Journal of Physics, vol.
Weidemuller's group created molecules made of an atom of lithium and one of cesium, similar to Ye's diatomic molecule of potassium and rubidium.
Two colliding atoms can absorb a photon and be photo-associated into an excited, diatomic molecule. NIST researchers investigated the fundamental rate at which this process can take place in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and demonstrated that simple classical saturation arguments do not work when applied to this situation.