dicarboxylic acid

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dicarboxylic acid

[dī¦kär·bäk¦sil·ik ′as·əd]
(organic chemistry)
A compound with two carboxyl groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scharrer (1990) Transport of tri-and dicarboxylic acids across the intestinal brush border membrane of calves.
Synthesis of Dipropargyl Esters of Dicarboxylic Acids (Bis-alkyne Monomers).
Martin, "Surface complexation and dissolution of hematite by Cj -C6 dicarboxylic acids at pH = 5.0," Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, vol.
(1.) Data obtained from the Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology, Dicarboxylic Acids, DOI: 10.1002/0471238961.
They also found other pyridine carboxylic acids at similar concentrations and, for the first time, found pyridine dicarboxylic acids. "We discovered a pattern -- less vitamin B3 (and other pyridine carboxylic acids) was found in meteorites that came from asteroids that were more altered by liquid water.
Recent work in our laboratories focused on the kinetics and equilibria of complex-formation reactions of cis-(diamine)palladium(II) complexes with DNA, the major target in chemotherapy of tumours, and biorelevant ligands as amino acids, peptides, dicarboxylic acids, and esters [15-18].
Secondly, fasting ketosis is frequently accompanied by excretion of medium-chain dicarboxylic acids from fatty acid catabolism, which are only produced by peroxisomal [beta]-oxidation [36].
They showed that considerable amounts of dicarboxylic acids were excreted in the urine, when medium and long chain fatty acids were administered to animals or humans.(5),(6) In a subsequent study, Verkade (7) showed that [omega]-oxidation of fatty acids involved two reaction steps (Fig.
Especially, dicarboxylic acids such as malonic acid derivatives could be anchored to the surface of Ti[O.sub.2] more effectively than monocarboxylic acids, and there are few previous papers about dicarboxylic acids as coadsorbents [12].
Along with succinic acid and fumaric acid it belongs to the group of C4 dicarboxylic acids. C4 acids can be converted into 1.4-butanediol (BOO), a veritable "Swiss Army knife" of the chemical industry that can be further converted into numerous chemicals, including plastics, polymers and resins.
One of the processing solutions would be the use of the mixture of dicarboxylic acids obtained by oxidation of kukersite kerogen.
This paper provides a method for preparation of the dicarboxylic acids from the corresponding aldehydocarboxilic ones with a good yield and high purity.