Dichlone

dichlone

[′dī‚klōn]
(organic chemistry)
C10H4O2Cl2 A yellow, crystalline compound, used as a fungicide for foliage and as an algicide.

Dichlone

 

the generic name for 2,3-dichloro-l,4-naphthoquinone (C10H4O2Cl2), a fungicidal chemical agent used against fungous plant diseases. It is used in the form of an aqueous suspension of 50-percent wettable powder to combat rice blast and spots on plants of the genus Prunus, as well as fungous diseases of vegetable and ornamental crops (with treatment halted 20 days before harvest). The dose here is 2.5–5.0 kg of the preparation per hectare. In the fight against diseases of vegetable crops, the seeds too are dusted with 5 g of 50-percent dichlone powder per 1 kg of seeds. Dichlone is moderately toxic to humans and animals, irritating the mucosa and skin.

References in periodicals archive ?
Although we identified compounds that were previously shown to inhibit a particular enzyme class or receptor, we surprisingly discovered that triclosan, a microbiocide present in personal care products, inhibits carboxylesterases and that dichlone, a fungicide, strongly inhibits the ryanodine receptors.
Interestingly, even given the promiscuity of AhR ligand binding (Denison and Heath-Pagliuso 1998; Denison and Nagy 2003), only two fungicide chemicals, 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-benzothiazole (CPB) and dichlone, induced AhR-dependent gene expression, and they were relatively weak inducers.
For both receptors, the largest effect was observed for chloranil ([IC.sub.50] < 1.0 [micro]M) and dichlone ([IC.sub.50] < 1.0 [micro]M), which both contain in their structure a 2,3-dichloro-1,4-quinone.