Dickon

Dickon

one of “nature’s gentlemen.” [Children’s Lit.: The Secret Garden]
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References in classic literature ?
Our Dickon, he's twelve years old and he's got a young pony he calls his own."
So she began to feel a slight interest in Dickon, and as she had never before been interested in any one but herself, it was the dawning of a healthy sentiment.
don't I wish Dickon and Phil an' Jane an' th' rest of 'em had what's here under their pinafores."
Our Dickon goes off on th' moor by himself an' plays for hours.
"Dickon," cried Mother Rigby, "a coal for my pipe!"
"Thank ye, Dickon! And now for making this scarecrow.
"Dickon," cried she sharply, "another coal for my pipe!"
But where that chimney corner might be, or who brought the coal from it,--further than that the invisible messenger seemed to respond to the name of Dickon,--I cannot tell.
“I am but too happy, Dickon, to tempt him to eat with ourselves,” said Marmaduke, “to think of offering even the indignity you propose.”
You are sure that your English progenitor was great, Dickon, whatever his profession might have been?”
“I marvel that you should be satisfied with so scanty a provision of gentility in the olden time, Dickon. Most of the American genealogists commence their traditions like the stories for children, with three brothers, taking especial care that one of the triumvirate shall be the pro genitor of any of the same name who may happen to be better furnished with worldly gear than themselves.
“Surely, Dickon, you will not execute till I condemn!