drongo

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drongo

(drŏng`gō), any of the insect-eating Old World birds of the family Dicruridae. Most species have black plumage with an iridescent purple or green shimmer and long, deeply forked tails. They have long pointed wings and stout, hooked bills ornamented with long bristles about the mouth. Most have ornamental crests or head plumes. Drongos range in body length from 7 to 15 in. (18–38 cm); the tail in some species is as long as 28 in. (71 cm). Solitary, arboreal birds of forests, wooded savannas, and fields, drongos are most numerous in S Asia, but also occur in S Africa and NE Australia. Typical of the family is the king crow, Dicrurus macrocerus, found from India to Java and Taiwan. Drongos are powerful, aggressive birds and will drive off birds much larger than themselves, incidentally providing protection to more docile species that nest in the same trees. Members of some species follow cattle in order to feed on the associated insects. There are about 20 drongo species, classified in two genera, Dicrurus and Chaetorhynchus, of the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Passeriformes, family Dicruridae.
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drongo

any insectivorous songbird of the family Dicruridae, of the Old World tropics, having a glossy black plumage, a forked tail, and a stout bill
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
A number of other birdwatchers quickly arrived, including Maarten Verhage, Oscar Campbell and Simon Aspinall, and, after a further two hours of watching the bird, I returned home to consult reference books and the Internet for pictures of both Black Drongo and of Ashy Drongo Dicrurus leucophaeus, which appeared to be a strong possibility.
Sixty-two active nests of various bird species were recorded; common myna Acredotheris tristis, house crow Corvus splendens, Indian robin Saxicoloides fulicatus and black drongo Dicrurus macrocerus preferred Kikar Acacia nilotica and Eucalyptus camaldulensis for nesting purpose while black kite Milvus migrans utilized semal tree Bombax ceiba.
Four nests of black drongo Dicrurus macrocercus were recorded at sites-II and III (Tables II and V; Fig.
The Bronzed Drongo Dicrurus aeneus (WG, BS) and Crow-billed Drongo D.
Spodiopsar cineraceus (8.4%) and Riparia riparia (2.8%) were the two most common birds in Agricultural habitat, whereas 8 bird species, Tachybaptus ruficollis, Ardea cinerea, Ixobrychus cinnamomeus, Buteo buteo, Calidris temminckii, Dicrurus leucophaeus,
The maximum percentage of Black Drongo (Dicrurus macrocersus vieillot) is 20.82 % while minimum of little green bee-eater (Merops orientalis) and Purple sunbird (Nectarinia asiatica) that was 0.86 %.
(common yellow-bellied bat), Funambulus pennantii (palm squirrel), grey francolin, Streptopelia decaocto (Eurasian collared dove), Streptopelia tranquebarica (red-collared dove),Stigmatopelia senegalensis (laughing dove), Centropus sinensis (greater coucal), Merops orientalis (little green bee-eater), Merops superciliosus (Madagascar bee-eater), Coracias benghalensis (Indian Roller), Pycnonotus leucogenys (Himalyan bulbul), Pycnonotus cafer (red-vented bulbul), Turdoides caudatus (common babbler), Lanius vittatus (bay backed shrike), Lanius schach (rufous- backed shrike), Dicrurus macrocercus (black drongo), Calotes versicolor (common tree lizard) and Acanthodactylus cantoris (blue-tail sand lizard).
These were cattle egret Bubulcus ibis, bank myna Acridotheres ginginianus, crested lark Galerida cristata and black drongo Dicrurus macrocercus.