Diction, Faulty

Diction, Faulty

Ace, Jane
(1905–1974) radio personality, remembered for sayings such as “up at the crank of dawn.” [Radio: “Easy Aces” in Buxton, 74–75]
Amos ‘n’ Andy
early radio buffoons who distorted language: “I’se regusted!” [Radio: Buxton, 13–14]
Bottom, Nick
tradesman-actor who constantly misuses words. [Br. Drama: Shakespeare A Midsummer Night’s Dream]
Claudius
because he stammered, held in little esteem as emperor. [Br. Lit.: I, Claudius]
Clouseau, Inspector Jacques
infamous, tongue-tripping French detective. [Am. Cinema: The Pink Panther in Halliwell, 565]
Dean, Dizzy
(1911–1974) famous baseball pitcher turned sports announcer: “He slud inta t’ird.” [Radio: Buxton, 223]
Dean, James
(1931–1955) actor whose inarticulateness epitomized the anti-eloquence of American youth in the 1950s. [Am. Cinema: Griffith, 423]
Demosthenes
(384–322 B.C.) learned proper diction by practicing with mouth full of pebbles. [Gk. Hist.: NCE, 744]
Dogberry
constable who garbles every phrase he speaks. [Br. Drama: Benét, 277]
Doolittle, Eliza
Cockney flower girl transformed from guttersnipe to lady via better English. [Br. Lit.: Pygmalion]
Ephraimites
identified as enemy by mispronunciation of “shibboleth.” [O.T.: Judges 12:6]
Fudd, Elmer
disgruntled little man, stammers out his frustration at impish rabbit. [TV: “The Bugs Bunny Show” in Terrace, I, 125]
Malaprop, Mrs.
eponymous blunderer in word usage. [Br. Drama: Benét, 623]
Partington, Mrs.
foolish old lady who constantly misuses words. [Am. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 681]
Pig, Porky
stuttering porcine character in film cartoons. [Comics: Horn, 562–563]
Pip
how orphan Philip Pirrup says his name. [Br. Lit.: Great Expectations]
Spooner, Rev. W. A.
(1844–1930) legendary for transposing initial sounds: “our queer dean Mary”; hence, spoonerism. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1029]
Sylvester
the lisping feline star of film cartoons. [TV: “The Bugs Bunny Show” in Terrace, I, 125]