Didache


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Didache

(dĭd`əkē) [Gr.,=teaching], early Christian work written in Greek, called also The Teaching of the Twelve Apostles. Dates for its composition suggested by scholars have ranged from A.D. 50 to A.D. 150. Discovered in 1875 by Bryennios, Greek Orthodox metropolitan of Nicomedia, it is an invaluable primary source for the primitive church. The first part is a collection of moral precepts, perhaps based on rabbinical teachings (there are many quotations from the Old Testament); the second portion gives directions for baptism and the Eucharist; the third contains directions for bishops and deacons. The Didache may be of composite authorship. A short work, it has been published in English translation in collections of patristic literature.
References in periodicals archive ?
58) The Didache was first published in 1883 after it had been discovered by Philotheos Bryennios in the eleventh-century manuscript, Codex Hierosolymitanus 1056.
The Didache (1996), for example, draws attention to the correlation between one's conduct and how one's teaching ought to be received, warning, "And every prophet who teaches the truth, but does not do what he teaches, is a false prophet" (XI.
Die gebed is in die eerste eeu in die Didache opgeneem, 'n geskrif wat waarskynlik die eerste "handleiding" vir Christene was.
Paul, the Didache, Justin Martyr, Irenaeus, and Cyprian all imply or speak explicitly of the Eucharist as a sacrifice).
There are two Ways," begins the Didache, "a Way of Life and a Way of Death, and the difference between these two Ways is great.
Yet Acts 27:9 (together with Romans 14:5-6, Colossians 2:16-20 and Didache 14:1) may function purely as a mechanism for dating rather than a record of observance (Schuller 2006:872-874).
In the Didache (also called "The Teaching of the Twelve Apostles, written around the yea 100), there are instructions concerning the rite of initiation into Christ: "Baptize in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost, in living water.
The earliest manuel for Christian living was written between 50-80 AD, titled "The Didache or The Teachings of the Twelve Apostles," laid out the two paths one can take: the way of life and the way of death.
The earliest widely used statement of doctrine and practice in Christianity outside Sacred Scripture, dating from the late first or early second century, is the Didache (Teaching of the Twelve Apostles).
See JESUIT CONFERENCE, STANDING FOR THE UNBORN 3 (2003) (citing Didache and noting that Catholic tradition has consistently been opposed to abortion).
Pines, "The Oath of Asaph the Physician and Yohanan Ben Zabda: Its Relation to the Hippocratic Oath and the Doctrina Duarum Viarum of the Didache," Proceedings of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities 9 (1975): 223-64.
Another early Christian text in which one finds the Lord's Prayer is the Teaching of the Twelve Apostles, usually called the Didache (or Teaching) by scholars.