macroelement

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macroelement

[¦mak·rō′el·ə·mənt]
(industrial engineering)
An element of a work cycle whose time span is long enough to be observed and measured with a stopwatch.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
There were zero deaths from any dietary mineral supplement.
'Salt is a dietary mineral used for flavouring and preservation needed by all known living creatures and if abused, it can be harmful.
Another newly identified gene area raises important questions about how a lack of selenium--a common dietary mineral found in some nuts, certain green vegetables, liver and other meats--might affect preterm birth risk.
Magnesium Glycinate is an essential dietary mineral reacted with an amino acid.
Along with potassium, magnesium is arguably the hottest up-and-coming dietary mineral, recognized for its many health benefits, which continue to be elucidated, according to market research publisher Packaged Facts, Rockville, MD.
Next several chapters discuss regulatory frameworks regarding dietary mineral occurrence, trace and toxic elements, and variation of mineral composition based on source geography and food processing.
Joel Wallach, Epigenetics contends that many diseases currently considered genetic in nature, such as Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, and cystic fibrosis, are actually a result of dietary mineral deficiencies.
From the present study it can be concluded that rise in serum levels of calcium and phosphorus at parturition and 1 week later of post parturient period after given pre-partum dietary mineral supplementation.
Study of the effect of the dietary mineral content on the reproductive performance of rabbits of both sexes and on the zootechnical performance of their litters.
Throughout the world, there is increasing interest in the importance of dietary mineral elements in the prevention of several diseases.
According to the most recent statistics available from the US National Poison Data System, there was not even one death caused by a vitamin or dietary mineral in 2007.
Bioavailable livestock mineral requirements will usually be lower values than requirements for total dietary mineral intake.