Digenis Akritas

Digenis Akritas

 

(in Russian, Devgenievo deianie, “Digenis’ Deed”), an Old Russian translated narrative. The translation or adaptation of the Greek original, a tenth-century Byzantine poem that has not survived, was done no later than the 12th or 13th century. Tales from the Byzantine heroic epic about the struggle of the Greeks with the Saracens and the exploits of Digenis Akritas are the basic subject of the poem. Characteristic of the style of the Russian text are elements of the oral poetic tradition and the military narrative style of Kievan Rus’. The medieval idea of the perfect hero is embodied in Digenis. The oldest extant text, from the 16th century, was found in the same collection as The Tale of Igor’s Campaign.

REFERENCE

Kuz’mina, V. D. Devgenievo deianie. Moscow, 1962.
References in periodicals archive ?
Motorists from the areas of Pallouriotissa, Lykavitos and Famagusta Gate should go via Makarios, Digenis Akritas, Spyros Kyprianou (former Santa Rosa) towards Grivas Dighenis Avenue heading in the direction of Strovolos, Lakatamia, Engomi, Ayios Dometios and Ayios Pavlos.
A man with long curling locks, probably the folk hero, Digenis Akritas, sits on a folding stool holding a woman on his lap with his right hand.
Legend has it that Petra tou Roumiou was thrown by the Byzantine hero Digenis Akritas to sink the ships of invading Arab raiders.
Motorists from the areas of Pallouriotissa, Lykavitos and Famagusta Gate should go via Makarios avenue, Digenis Akritas avenue, Spyros Kyprianou avenue (former Santa Rosa) towards Griva Digenis Avenue heading in the direction of Strovolos, Lakatamia, Engomi, Ayios Dometios and Ayios Pavlos.
The Pentadactilos range -- Besparmak in Turkish -- derives its name from the myth of Digenis Akritas who according to legend left marks from the knuckles of his five fingers on the mountain as he leapt into Asia Minor, which is obviously apocryphal but which explains its appeal to nationalists like George Grivas who used Digenis as his nom de guerre and Tasos Papadopoulos whose nefarious plan against the Turkish Cypriots was called Akritas.
But the person of Digenis Akritas himself was a lot more complex and had nothing to do with nationalism -- the reverse in fact.
The project's footprint would cover some 300,000 square metres next to the Engomi Health Centre, located on a large tract of land owned by Kykkos Monastery and bounded by Digenis Akritas Avenue, King Paul Street, Nicos Kranidiotis Street and Archangel Michael Avenue.
The assailant made off on a red motorbike parked outside the branch, heading in the direction of Digenis Akritas Avenue.