Digg


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Digg

A website that aggregates links and brief descriptions to news articles, videos and podcasts, which are voted on by members who "Digg it!" Founded in 2004, submissions are grouped by topic, and links with the most Diggs move to the home page. A "bury" vote can also be cast if the material is deemed inaccurate or dull, and the site may eventually remove it. When members Digg a particular link, it is kept in their profile page.

In 2012, Digg was sold to three entities. New York technology incubator Betaworks acquired the technology; the Washington Post acquired staff, and LinkedIn obtained patents. In 2016, Gannett partnered with Digg, and two years later, advertiser BuySellAds acquired the company. For more information, visit www.digg.com. See Digg Reader.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company said Digg uses proprietary data sources and an editorial team to curate the best content on the web for millions of people every month.
The post also stated that the aim of the Digg Reader was to create a simple, clean and uncluttered reading experience.
The argument could go on, but instead, let's look at Digg, one of the most curious of the new Me Generation sites.
KR: Digg is like your newspaper, but rather than a handful of editors determining what's on the front page, the masses do.
Digg said that the product would allow users to integrate with note-taking services such as Evernote, and tools to let users sort, filter and rank their feeds.
According to ZDnet, Digg fate started turning around 2010, when a group, the Digg Patriots, was revealed to be attempting to censor certain liberal campaigns, using multiple accounts to ban certain posts.
Digg's owners do have the ability to kill a story they deem unsuitable, offensive, or otherwise not in their interests.
According to the Los Angeles Times, Betaworks intends to merge Digg into News.me, a start-up it launched last year that sends users a daily newsletter containing content shared by their friends on Facebook and followers on Twitter.
Digg is a bit more sophisticated because the content is broken down into categories.
The more people who like a story (and click the 'Digg it!' button next to its headline), the higher up the story will appear.
Digg's latest redesign, with version 4 being the last major change, appears to have alienated users and sent them elsewhere.