Digg

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Digg

A social news website that accepts links and brief descriptions to news articles, videos and podcasts from members, all of which are voted on by other members who "digg it!" Founded in late 2004 by Kevin Rose, submissions are grouped by topic, and links with the most votes (Diggs) move to the home page. Members can also cast a "bury" vote if they feel the material is inaccurate or dull, and the site may eventually remove it. When members digg a particular link, it is kept in their profile page for future access. For more information, visit www.digg.com.

In 2012, Digg was sold to three entities. New York technology incubator Betaworks acquired the technology, the Washington Post acquired staff, and LinkedIn acquired patents.
References in periodicals archive ?
was the theme of a panel discussion which saw participation from Amanda Wills, former deputy executive editor at Mashable and currently with CNN; David Weiner, Editor at large at Digg.
Also, traditional news outlets may be only the first or, as is often the case among Digg.
Lastly in M&A news, the technology development firm Betaworks of New York City, purchased the assets of the site Digg.
While the tools may not be all that different from those offered by rivals such as Digg.
According to some Australian websites, Twitter tried to shut uSocial down, accusing it of spamming members, while the Los Angeles Times reported that Digg.
And that's why, if you use IE6, you're going to start seeing a lot of warnings every time you visit big sites like Digg.
com, a conservative foil to the wildly popular user-generated social media site Digg.
The rules are simple: Whoever receives the most votes on social networking search engine Digg.
By building a clone of the popular story-sharing web site digg.
Most of the posts are provided ed by Bud Hebeler or Digg.
The story was picked up by a member at community news site Digg.
My favorite discussion of the topic I found on a chatty website called digg.