foxglove

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Related to Digitalis purpurea: digoxin, digitoxin, digitalis toxicity

foxglove:

see figwortfigwort,
common name for some members of the Scrophulariaceae, a family comprising chiefly herbs and small shrubs and distributed widely over all continents. The family includes a few climbing types and some parasitic and saprophytic forms.
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foxglove

any Eurasian scrophulariaceous plant of the genus Digitalis, esp D. purpurea, having spikes of purple or white thimble-like flowers. The soft wrinkled leaves are a source of digitalis
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
En esta investigacion se utilizo como material vegetal plantas in vitro obtenidas a partir de semillas de Digitalis purpurea L.
foxglove (Digitalis purpurea)--a test of a new model.
Digitalis purpurea is a plant whose profusion of spikes and thimble-shaped, multi-colored blossoms delight many a gardener.
The wild species, Digitalis purpurea, a hardy biennial, is grown for its long spires of thimble-shaped bells in shades of white to rose-purple in early to mid-summer, often with a darker spotting within the flower.
The tapering spires of foxgloves (Digitalis purpurea) look magnificent in groups in a herbaceous border or among shrubs.
If you feel that these selected forms of Digitalis purpurea are too big for your garden, remember that, although they are giants in height, they are narrow at the base, and happily squeeze between other plants.
One common type of polymorphism involves rare white-flowered plants in populations of plants with pigmented flowers (e.g., Delphinium nelsonii, Waser and Price 1981; Phlox pilosa, Levin and Kerster 1970; Digitalis purpurea, Ernst 1987; Echium plantagineum, Burdon et al.