Dilmun

(redirected from Dilmun civilization)

Dilmun

dwelling of gods where sun rose. [Sumerian Myth.: Gaster, 24]
See: Heaven
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The burial mounds are evidence of the Early Dilmun civilization, around the 2nd millennium BCE, during which Bahrain became a trade hub, whose prosperity enabled the inhabitants to develop an elaborate burial tradition applicable to the entire population.
The burial grounds, located in the western part of the island nation, include 21 archeological sites built between 2050 and 1750 BC, which demonstrate evidence of the early Dilmun civilization, when Bahrain became a trade hub.
The burial mounds bear witness to the flourishing of the Early Dilmun civilization around the 2nd millennium BCE.
Bahrain is the first site of the ancient Dilmun civilization. Then came the conversion to Islam and a period of Arab rule in the 600's AD.
HH Shaikh Nasser pointed: "Bahrain is a non-discriminatory, diverse nation, which preserved this characteristic for over 7,000 years since the Dilmun civilization. Our diversity - in culture, sects, religions, colours and more - stipulates coexistence, mutual respect and empathy.
Bahrain is a 5,000-year-old economic hub of the Middle East that dates back to the ancient Dilmun Civilization. Bahrain's early inhabitants came from Babylon, Greece, Rome and Persia.
"Music has been a part of the kingdom's culture dating back to 4,000 years to the Dilmun civilization. It's believed that music was used in ceremonies and religious celebrations and continues to be used to this very day."
The Danish team worked in Bahrain in the 1950s and made significant results in the discovery of the Dilmun civilization and the Stone Age there.
The area dedicated to the Dilmun civilization (which began in the 3rd millennium BCE and continued until around 500 BCE) provides a history of the emergence of camel herders in the Gulf (around 1700 BCE) and of cities in the eastern part of the Arabian Peninsula.
Bahrain Fort & Museum --Thought to be once the centre of power for the ancient Dilmun civilization, Qal'at Al Bahrain has UNESCO World Heritage status.
The book consists of three chapters, the first chapter defines singing and expressions of national history of Dilmun civilization, while the second deals with national singing history and its stages and national expressions since 1783 until the Reform Project of His Majesty the King.