Diluvium


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Diluvium

 

an obsolete term that was used in geology as a synonym for the Pleistocene epoch. In Soviet geology the term has passed out of use, although many German scientists continue to use it. It was proposed in 1823 by Buckland, who thought that the Quaternary sediments had been caused by the Biblical flood.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The nature of the "diluvium" persisted as a great puzzle.
Even as geologists continued to debate the nature of the causes that produced the diluvium, Lyell issued volume 1 of Principles of Geology in 1830.
In the Visio Anglie (having a diluvium of its own too, of course), (19) Gower quotes repeatedly, prominently from this episode that Ovid made his paradigmatic point of departure.
The landslide deposit mainly consists of Quaternary sediments, including diluvium layer of Quaternary System ([Q.sup.dl]), glaciofluvial deposit of Holocene Series ([Q.sup.fgl]), and landslide deposit ([Q.sup.del]).
Klimaszewski, M.: 1937, Morfologia i dyluwium doliny Dunajca od Pienin po ujscie (Morphologie und Diluvium des Dunajec-Tales von den Pieninen bis zur Mundung), Prace Instytutu Geograficznego UJ, 18, 1-54.
The main geological conditions of tunnel section are filled soil, mucky soil, fine sand layer, diluvium and alluvium layer, and intense weathering mud rock.
The shallow diluvium landslides occur in steep slopes, nearly always in direct connection with lateral erosion of the streams, being thus closely related to the bank scouring.