Dimnah

Dimnah

(dĭm`nə), the same as RimmonRimmon
, in the Bible. 1 Syrian god. 2 Father of the murderers of Ish-bosheth. 3 Rock, E of Bethel. There the remnants of the Benjamites took refuge after the battle of Gibeah. 4 See En-rimmon.
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 (5.)
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In fact, Panchatantra's original Sanskrit text was lost after it was translated into Persian and the Arabs translated it from Persian to Arabic as "Kalila wa Dimnah," and it reached Europe and other parts of the world, Al-Sati said.
Our lands have been taken away from us for making the Dimnah Dam.
The same holds for other early and rare manuscripts like Abu al-Ma'ali Nasr-Allah's early version of the Kalilah wa Dimnah (with close stylistic relation to the miniatures of an earlier version of the work in the Istanbul University Library), Sa'di's Bustan dated 1521, and other well-known Persian classical MSS written and illustrated in Heart, Shiraz, Tabriz and other cities in the 15th and 16th centuries.
Amer's argument hinges on two assumptions: first, that the Romulus Nilantii, to which some of Marie's apologues have been linked, (1) typifies the entire medieval Latin fable tradition; and, second, that the Kalilah wa Dimnah, an Arabic collection of tales, also influenced Marie's work.
especially the eighth-century Arabic translation, the Kalilah wa Dimnah by Abdallah Ibn al-Mouqaffa.
The seven words - no hint that others are admissible - are talal (ruin), dar (abode), rab (vernal encampment), nuy (trench), dimnah (dung), athafi (hearthstones), and sual (question).
To dimnah JS devotes the most space, arguing that the quintessential statement on its poetic meaning is al-Sharif al-Murtada's "Fa imma shituma an tusidani/fa murra bi ala d-dimani l-bawali" (p.
The Panca-tantra , a Sanskrit compilation of beast fables, has survived only in an 8th-century Arabic translation known as the Kalilah wa Dimnah, after two jackals that figure in one of the tales.
Elsewhere in the epic, when the physician Burzu, who brought the Kalilah wa Dimnah from India, is called surayandah (M, 8:248, v.
Although this work also is lost, a Syriac translation of it has survived, together with the famous Arabic translation by Ibn al-Muqaffa` (died AD 760), known as Kalilah wa Dimnah after the two jackals that figure in the first story.
In addition to parts of his divan (collection of poems), one of his most important contributions to literature is his translation from Arabic to New Persian of Kalilah wa Dimnah (known in English as The Fables of Bidpai), a collection of fables of Indian origin.