Dinarides


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Dinarides

[di′nar·ə‚dēz]
(geography)
A mountain system, east of the Adriatic Sea, in Yugoslavia.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
and Radivojevic, D.: 2012, On the formation and evolution of the Pannonian Basin: constraints derived from the structure of the junction area between the Carpathians and Dinarides.Tectonics, 31, No.
"To explain this" - adds the lead author Pier [ETH]auro Ciachino, from Torino, Italy - "we must go back at least to the Late Oligocene (29-24 million years) where a continuum of land connected the Dinarides and Rhodopes mountains, allowing colonization by this phyletic lineage.
However, it can be said that all populations grow in the extreme ecological conditions of the Dinarides karst.
The Trepca mine is located in the Vardar zone, a nappe of folded and overthrust rock units within the Dinarides Alpine Belt.
The fact that the Albanian population lives in territories that belong to mountain chain known as Dinarides or the Dinaric Alps (Italy, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Albania) has sparked the curiosity of many anthropologists to study the morphological type of the Albanians (Coon, 1950).
Well-known flysch deposits are found in the forelands of the Pyrenees, Dinarides, northern Alps, and Carpathians and tectonically similar regions in Italy, the Balkans, and Cyprus.
Geographically, this region covers the main mountain chains of Europe and of North Africa, including those of the Balkans, Dinarides, Apennines, Pyrennees, Cantabrian Mts, Sierra Nevada and a whole array of other Mediterranean mountain ranges such as the Sistema Central in the Iberian Peninsula and those of Portugal and Sicily, and finally the Atlas of North Africa (Figure 1).
The Dinaric thrust systems are post-Eocene, representing a NW-SE striking fold-and-thrust belt that can be followed from the Istra peninsula towards central Slovenia (Vrabec and Fodor, 2006) and that belongs to the External Dinarides.