Dinka


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Dinka

 

(self-designation, Jang), a people living in the southern part of the Republic of the Sudan, on both banks of the White Nile and in the basin of the Mountain Nile (Bahr al Jabal). The language of the Dinkas belongs to the northwestern group of the Nilotic languages. Population, approximately 1.8 million (1970, estimate). Most Dinkas have preserved their ancient traditional beliefs; some are Christians. Their chief occupations are livestock raising (cattle, sheep, and goats) and, to a lesser extent, hoe farming (durra, vegetables, and tobacco). A small number of Dinkas work on plantations and in industrial enterprises.

REFERENCE

Butt, A. The Nilotes of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan and Uganda. London, 1952.

Dinka

 

the language of the Dinka people. It is related to the northwestern group of the Nilotic languages. It is spoken in the southern part of the Sudan by approximately 1.8 million people (1970, estimate).

References in periodicals archive ?
He explained that Alor has recently was in good contacts with the Misseriya and has called to establish contact between the Misseriya and Dinka for peaceful coexistence in the area.
It was May 2012 and my journey to the dry season grazing lands (toe) in the flood plain of the western Dinka in northern South Sudan passed the homestead of Chief Madhol.
The conference has reviewed two working papers on the National Number for Abyei Dinka and the organizational structure of the native administration of Abyei Dinka.
This study presents the process of translating and culturally adapting the English version of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25) into Dinka, a South Sudanese tribal language.
THE failed coup of December 16 attempted by the ex- Vice- President Riek Machar ( belonging to the Lou Nuer tribe) against the current President Salva Kiir ( from the Dinka tribe) has caused a split in the South Sudanese Army which has dealt a severe blow to efforts at restoring peace amid growing ethnic killings.
Earlier this month the peacekeepers shot dead a Dinka who was among a group of youths who harassed Misseriya leaders visiting the town, a witness said.
"The Dinka have been talking about a local referendum they are going to organise on their own outside the framework of the peace agreement between the north and the south," he said.
The book documents the development of Christianity among the Dinka from the first missionary activity, Catholic and Protestant, and explores the reasons for earlier resistance to the Gospel as well as the motivation for conversion at this time of suffering and loss.
The Baggara did not join in the first round of the civil war, but, after droughts in the 1970s and 1980s, they moved south to Dinka territory for pasture for their surviving cattle and raided there for cattle and people to recoup their losses.
In April 1988, Burr and Collins (1995:114) reported hunger-stricken Dinka women "pawning" their children to Rizeigat Arabs for 300 Sudanese pounds in order to stay alive with the understanding that the children would be looked after until better days, not that they were actually selling their children.
Government policy in southern Sudan was "to build up a series of self-contained racial or tribal units with structure and organization based upon the indigenous customs, traditional usage and beliefs."(3) Part of the motivation for the policy was fear of southern nationalism as the people were introduced to rapid education and modernity.(4) The Nilotics, especially the Dinka and the Nuer, fiercely resisted British rule for two decades.