Dinka

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Dinka

 

(self-designation, Jang), a people living in the southern part of the Republic of the Sudan, on both banks of the White Nile and in the basin of the Mountain Nile (Bahr al Jabal). The language of the Dinkas belongs to the northwestern group of the Nilotic languages. Population, approximately 1.8 million (1970, estimate). Most Dinkas have preserved their ancient traditional beliefs; some are Christians. Their chief occupations are livestock raising (cattle, sheep, and goats) and, to a lesser extent, hoe farming (durra, vegetables, and tobacco). A small number of Dinkas work on plantations and in industrial enterprises.

REFERENCE

Butt, A. The Nilotes of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan and Uganda. London, 1952.

Dinka

 

the language of the Dinka people. It is related to the northwestern group of the Nilotic languages. It is spoken in the southern part of the Sudan by approximately 1.8 million people (1970, estimate).

References in periodicals archive ?
These included occupation and land rights that resulted from the sharing use of land and water between two tribal groups: the nine Ngok Dinka tribes and the Misseriya.
These survivors are of Nuer ethnicity, and they say the South Sudan army - disproportionately composed of the rival Dinka tribe - targeted them for that reason.
The conflict soon turned into an all-out war, with violence taking on an ethnic dimension that pitted the president's Dinka tribe against Machar's Nuer ethnic group.
The South Sudanese conflict began in December 2013 after president of South Sudan, Salva Kiir of the Dinka tribe fired his vice president, Riek Machar of the Nuer tribe.
The unrest in South Sudan has left thousands dead and displaced 873,000 people, including tens of thousands who have crammed into UNMISS bases in fear of ethnic attacks by either President Salva Kiir's Dinka tribe or rebel leader Riek Machar's Nuer tribe.
He did not refer to the voting underway Monday by members of Abyei's Ngok Dinka tribe, which is closely connected with South Sudan and whose members are settled in Abyei.
In late August, Lou-Nuer tribesmen killed 46 people from the rival Dinka tribe, according to UN reports.
Families and chiefs of the southern Sudanese Dinka tribe have long attempted to redeem abducted women and children from slavery.
The conflict has also taken on an ethnic dimension, pitting the president's Dinka tribe against Machar's Nuer ethnic group.
The war has since spread across the world's newest nation, with thousands seeking UN protection from ethnic massacres by security forces from Kiir's Dinka tribe or rebels from Machar's Nuer people.
The South Sudanese conflict began on December 15 after president of South Sudan, Salva Kiir of the Dinka tribe fired his vice president, Riek Machar of the Nuer tribe.
Thousands of people have already been killed, UN officials say, while more than 200,000 have fled their homes -- many of them seeking protection from overstretched UN peacekeepers amid a wave of ethnic violence pitting members of Kiir's Dinka tribe against Machar's Nuer tribe.