Dio Chrysostom


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Dio Chrysostom

(dīo krĭs`əstəm, krĭsŏs`–), d. after A.D. 112, Greek Sophist and orator [Chrysostom=golden-mouthed], b. Prusa (modern Bursa) in Bithynia. He lived at Rome under Emperor Domitian, who subsequently banished him. He traveled widely, finally returning to Rome in the favor of emperors Nerva and Trajan. He leaned toward the philosophy of the Cynics and Stoics. With Plutarch he shared in the revival of Greek literature in the 1st cent. Extant are 80 orations on literary, political, and philosophical subjects.

Dio Chrysostom

2nd century ad, Greek orator and philosopher
References in periodicals archive ?
Loeb: Dio Chrysostom I: Discourses I-XI, Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
Mendelson, Llewellyn, and Dio Chrysostom are rare among analysts of legal custom.
Dio Chrysostom tells us that three types of government exist, but only monarchy is practical.
The career and conversion of Dio Chrysostom. JHS, v.
Furthermore, Pseudo-Diogenes as well as Dio Chrysostom evidently interpret the anecdote, while Plutarch adds to it for purposes of his own.
Dio Chrysostom's so-called Kingship orations-Stoicinfluenced speeches that are likely to have been formally delivered before Trajan between 100 and 103 C.E.--muster a variety of ethopoetic techniques.
Plutarch's contemporary and fellow Greek, Dio Chrysostom, in illustrating the good order and sobriety (sophrosyne) for which the city of Tarsus and its citizens were celebrated in earlier days, points out that many traces of such behaviour still survive and cites one example, the clothing adopted by women: apparently the women of Tarsus wore clothes of such a kind that no one saw any single part of them, any part of their face or the rest of their body, nor did the women themselves see anything `off the road', and there is no suggestion that this was an `oriental' rather than a Greek mode of attire (33.48).
As far as I can judge, the level of accuracy is high, one glaring exception being an index entry for 'Dio Chrysostomus, John', a composite figure assembled out of the Greek orator Dio Chrysostom and the Patriarch of Constantinople John Chrysostom, who lived three centuries later.
307-8; idem, The Roman World of Dio Chrysostom (Cambridge, Massachussets-London, 1978), pp.
He is simply replaced by one Hanno Sabellus mentioned by some of our sources (e.g., Dio Chrysostom, 25, 7; Pompeius Trogus, prol.
He adduces some rather unconvincing parallels from Plutarch and Dio Chrysostom to suggest that the whole passage (1: 27-2:18) reflects a 'standard discussion of the problem of discord and concord among citizens in the public domain' (p.
student of Dio Chrysostom, who, perhaps a half of a century earlier,