Dio Chrysostom


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Dio Chrysostom

(dīo krĭs`əstəm, krĭsŏs`–), d. after A.D. 112, Greek Sophist and orator [Chrysostom=golden-mouthed], b. Prusa (modern Bursa) in Bithynia. He lived at Rome under Emperor Domitian, who subsequently banished him. He traveled widely, finally returning to Rome in the favor of emperors Nerva and Trajan. He leaned toward the philosophy of the Cynics and Stoics. With Plutarch he shared in the revival of Greek literature in the 1st cent. Extant are 80 orations on literary, political, and philosophical subjects.

Dio Chrysostom

2nd century ad, Greek orator and philosopher
References in periodicals archive ?
Mendelson, Llewellyn, and Dio Chrysostom are rare among analysts of legal custom.
We must follow the lead of Dio Chrysostom and Professor Mendelson and resist these beguilements, because the additive analysis of custom to which they lead is untenable.
We are committed by the additive conception to regard disputes over customary rules as impossible, but customary rules, especially customary legal rules, are not like that; indeed, if we are to believe Dio Chrysostom, customs typically invite critical scrutiny and, as one might expect, dispute over that criticism.
Dio Chrysostom tells us that three types of government exist, but only monarchy is practical.
In an oration of Dio Chrysostom, where he makes Diogenes comment on various aspects of Alexander's behaviour, the philosopher stresses the superiority of natural emblems of kingship.
35) Apparently Dio Chrysostom disagrees (or is unfamiliar) with Pliny the Elder, according to whom the king bee had the emblem of a diadem around his head, exactly like a human sovereign (supra).
It is true the sophists themselves could and did easily mobilize the language of ethical condemnation in the course of their competitions for students and prestige: Dio Chrysostom, Aelius Aristides, Polemon, and other sophi sts in Philostratus are all on record as doing precisely that.
On the one hand, it is precisely their mastery of rhetoric's performative aspects that grants the sophist a place in the rhetorical school, civic festival, and the political assembly of the imperial city: their ability to advertise their know ledge of the various systems of rules that govern elite masculine behavior (whether they spring from a specific philosophical school, as in the case of Dio Chrysostom, or from the broader conventions of elite [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), and out of them to create a performance.
Dio Chrysostom, for example, spoke about and imitated the Cynics, while Aristides handled Platonic themes and Polemon engaged with Peripatetic writings on physiognomy.
The latter considers the attitude of Plutarch's Contemporary Dio Chrysostom in Myth and Moral Message in Dio Chrysostom.
Barry (`Aristocrats, Orators and the "Mob": Dio Chrysostom and the world of the Alexandrians', Historia 42 [1993], pp.
Brunt, `Aspects of the Social Thought of Dio Chrysostom and of the Stoics', PCPhS 19 (1973), pp.